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Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies Course Web Sites

Spring Term 2014 Courses

HACU-0101: Chorus

The Chorus is a performing ensemble in which students will learn skills of choral singing and sight-singing. They will be exposed to a wide variety of choral literature through rehearsal and performance, including a cappella and accompanied music, medieval through 20th century, ethnic, world music and folk. Several performances are given throughout the year. While this course is open to all and the ability to read music is not required, students are expected to have reasonable proficiency in aural learning (e.g. ability to sing on pitch).
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HACU-0112: Drawing Through: Fundamentals

This course is a rigorous research project in the possibilities, meanings, histories, practices and contemporary meanings of drawing. It functions as an introduction to different ways drawing is used in contemporary art making. As such, we will be doing different types of investigations weekly. Through investigations into the history of drawing practices- with particular focus on its role in the liberal arts- students will develop a facility with materials, methods, concepts, and critique. Collaboration and shared findings are highly encouraged. In addition, students will be asked to do two essential drawing/artmaking activities alongside weekly projects: 1. maintain a strong sketchbook practice and 2. develop an individual and personal visual vocabulary of concepts, themes, topics, subjects to be used in the creation of (drawing) artwork. Reading, writing, field trips, and oral critique are essential parts of the course as are the foundational activities of drawing and looking. This class will be challenging and useful for students at all levels of drawing experience, but is designed as a drawing foundation.


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HACU-0115: Bent Not Broken: A History of Queer Cinema

With an emphasis on American underground, experimental, and avant-garde works, this introductory level course will explore one path through the complex and winding history of queer cinema. We will examine films that are not only queer in content, but in form. We will look at these films, always with an historical eye, for the techniques they invented, for the culture(s) they championed and critiqued, and for the new ways of looking they offered us.

Students will be required to write weekly response papers, complete an in-class presentation, and delineate their own history of queer cinema.  


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HACU-0123: Degas, van Gogh, Gauguin

Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh, and Paul Gauguin each hold a special place in our popular imagination and in art historical studies. While each of these artists was associated with the avant-garde in late 19th century France, their lives and imagery have been the subjects of films, and myriad exhibitions and the resulting recent critical reassessment; their imagery also can be found on mugs, calendars, and even clothing. This course will focus on these three artists, primarily as historical figures but we also will look into their present positions in visual culture. In so doing, students will gain mastery of different art historical methods, from formalism and the social historical, to the psychoanalytic, post-structuralist, feminist, and post-colonialist.


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HACU-0130: Introduction to Individual Representational Painting and Collective, Abstract Work

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of painting, such as composition, value, and color. Students will learn about material and the technical issues of painting. Drawings will often be produced in tandem with paintings in order to illuminate visual ideas. We will work with water based and oil based paint on various surfaces. Besides creating individual paintings, students will collectively prepare and work on large-scale canvases. This course will develop from individual representational set-ups towards collective, abstract work. Regular class critiques will assist in examining formal composition principles. The course will focus on the work of non-western contemporary artists and we will discuss historic work examples from a post-colonial perspective. Readings and one paper on an artist to be assigned will be part of this class. Assignments will require students to work independently outside of class.


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HACU-0148: Introduction to Asia Through Music and Performing Arts

"Asia" is a diverse, dynamic, and complex cultural entity that encompasses a vast geographic area and a long rich history. In this course we will investigate some representative performing arts traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia, e.g., Indian classical music, Javanese gamelan, Chinese operas, Japanese noh theatre, as a way of learning about the regions' unique history, different value systems, aesthetic sensibilities, spiritual beliefs, philosophies, and ways of life. We will also cross-culturally examine these performing arts traditions to understand the past and ongoing trans-regional cultural interactions. No previous music training is necessary but the students are expected to engage in critical listening and basic musical analysis of various music examples.
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HACU-0149: Self-made Men: Masculinity and the American Novel

The history of the novel in America has always been intertwined with the production of an image of the American man. From Hawthorne's attempt to best the "mobs of scribbling women" to the idealized loner cowboy, from the hard-boiled journalistic prose of Hemingway to the maximalist and misogynist rantings of Roth, we might say that the epitome of the American self-made man is the novelistic protagonist. In this course, we will combine literary study and gender theory to begin to examine the myth of the American man, considering both how it is constructed and undermined in American literature. We will pay particular attention to the function of sexual and racial difference - and its erasure - in the idealization of the male protagonist (and author). Readings will draw from a range of texts from the 19th-century to the present, including short stories and novels by Melville, Hemingway, Chandler, Wright, O'Connor, Baldwin, Roth, Diaz and Wallace.


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HACU-0151: Making Dances I

This course is designed for any student curious about design in motion. It will introduce theories and processes of movement composition and choreographic analysis. We'll work with movement prompts and structured improvisations to discover ways to generate movement, and to compose it into set forms. We'll question expectations about what dance, or a "good" dance is, and push to broaden movement preferences. In the process students will hone skills in perceiving, describing and interpreting compositional strategies in choreography. They'll also study works of established choreographers from a range of styles, examine in depth the work of a master artist, and learn to write analytically about choreography. Students will work with group forms in class, but craft assigned studies in solo form, leading to a final, complete dance performed in an informal showing. No previous experience in dance is required. Concurrent study of dance technique is encouraged.
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HACU-0153: Community, Photography, Storytelling

Photography's history is rich with diverse theories and practices of community engagement and documentation; in this class students will contribute their own approach. Throughout the semester students will work closely with older members of the Amherst community, photographing together, participating in group critiques and exploring photography's ability to communicate. As a class we will study the array of historical and contemporary artists who intertwine social involvement with artistic detachment and students will be required to write extensively and produce art in response to their experiences. In addition, students will curate their narratives and the class photographs into a final exhibition. Prior photography experience is recommended but not required; it is required that students be able to listen empathetically and work well independently.


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HACU-0154: Introduction to Film Studies: The History of American Cinema 1895-1960

This course is designed to introduce students to key issues in film studies, focusing on the history of American cinema from 1895 to 1960. We will pay particular attention to the "golden age" of Hollywood, with forays into other national cinemas by way of comparison and critique. Screenings will range from actualities and trick films, to the early narrative features of D. W. Griffith, to the development of genres including film noir (Double Indemnity), the woman's film of the 1940s (Now, Voyager), the western (Stagecoach) and the suspense film (Rear Window). Several short papers and in-class discussions will address how to interpret film on the formal/stylistic level (sequence analysis, close reading, visual language) as well as in the context of major trends and figures in film history.


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HACU-0160: Introduction to Metaphysics

What is ultimately or fundamentally real? What is the nature of being? Is reality ultimately physical or nonphysical? Is it one or many, visible or invisible, discrete or diffuse, eternal or temporal? Philosophers have offered the wildest and most varied answers to these questions. Today, metaphysical debates continue to rage within philosophy, cultural theory, and social theory. In this course, we will survey a range of metaphysical theories, from ancient Greek, Indian, and Chinese ontological theories up through the most recent debates in European and Anglo-American philosophy. Readings from Heraclitus, Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, the Buddha, Nagarjuna, Samkara, Leibniz, Spinoza, Berkeley, Schopenhauer, Bergson, Heidegger, and Harman.


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HACU-0161: The English Bible

The English Romantic, William Blake, characterized the Bible as "the Great Code of Art," an observation that finds repeated illustration throughout the Western literary tradition from medieval mystery plays to the latest fiction of Toni Morrison. By the same token, biblical stories form the bedrock of the scriptural traditions of Christians, Muslims, and Jews the world over. What are these stories that have so captivated readers for over 2000 years? Why has the Bible had such an immense religious and imaginative appeal? This course introduces students to the full range of biblical literature from the stories of Genesis to the life and times of Jesus of Nazareth. While the course emphasizes literary features of the Bible as it has been rendered in English, we will also consider important religious, moral, and theological implications. Among the biblical texts considered will be the foundational stories of Genesis and Exodus; the books of Joshua, Judges, and Ruth; the stories of David and Kings; the Book of Job and the Song of Solomon; the prophets Isaiah and Ezekiel; New Testament gospels; Acts of the Apostles; and the Book of Revelation.


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HACU-0172: Commodities of Desire: Gendered Signs, Racialized Representations and Popular Culture

How does popular culture reproduce gendered identities and racialized difference(s)? By critically investigating racial stereotypes and hetero-sexist conventions within the varied field of popular culture (images, texts, and sounds), we can begin to understand and analyze how race and sexuality structure our desires and code our cultures. This course will employ Cultural Studies and Women's Studies to examine how the themes of exotification, hybridity, authenticity, cultural appropriation, essentialism, and liberal humanism circulate within the popular imaginary. In the process, we will consider the following questions: Can the consumption of popular culture be more ethical and active? What are the politics of production and consumption in an age of communication overload? What is resistance? Where is it located? How much agency does a consumer actually have? How responsible is the producer for his/her productions? Can gendered and raced commodities be used to explore difference? Or will their consumption lead to the reinforcement of sexist, racist, and homophobic stereotypes?


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HACU-0179: Black Literature Texts and Contexts: Past and Present

'Crossing the Danger Water:' 300+ Years of Black Inscriptions undertakes the study of writing and cultural production (broadly defined) by and about black people, as well as the various social, political, intellectual, aesthetic, and racialized contexts that shaped and produced such writing and cultural production. We will study both early and contemporary forms of black writing and cultural production, meaning works from centuries past and our present, and that encompass stories and black experiences inscribed in written form, song, visual culture, and film. The course is historically grounded, which means that, while addressing questions of race, nation, class, and gender, one of our central concerns will be to chart artistic and contextual shifts, repetitions, extended conversations and conditions, echoes and reverberations, and what all these have come to mean across time and what they meant in their own time. Requirements: attendance, response papers and posts, presentations, and in-class discussion.
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HACU-0180: Introduction to Media Studies

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of media studies, an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that analyzes the complex interactions between media, culture, art, politics and ideology. We will use American comedy as a lens through which to focus our study, as well as to develop an understanding of the relationship between media institutions, texts and audiences. In this discussion-based and writing-intensive course, students will read and write analyses of both cultural theory and specific texts, and ultimately produce a final paper on a topic of their own choosing.
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HACU-0181: Introduction to World Cinema (ll)

This is the second part of a year-long course in which we will continue to examine "world cinema" as a concept that is productive while studying film history but also one that needs to be critically examined. This course explores how cinema has been "global" from the very beginning, becoming a popular form of entertainment simultaneously in several countries, making worlds visible, and staging intercultural encounters. Simultaneously, it focuses on vibrant non-Western film traditions that are eclipsed by the global dominance of Hollywood but are, paradoxically, often called "world cinema." We will study key debates around national, post-colonial, and diasporic cinemas through a number of cultural and political contexts. We will also look at the interaction between and hybridization of Western and non-Western film cultures. Spring 2014 topics likely to include: Global Hollywood, Diasporic Cinema, Iranian Cinema, Israel/Palestine, Shanghai Modernism, Hong Kong Cinema, HK Auteurs in America, Contemporary Asian Art Cinema, Asian Extreme, and African Cinemas.


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HACU-0182: History of Photography

This course will be a selective examination of the history of photography in Europe and the U.S., from the earliest daguerreotypes in the 19th century to the digital works of the present. We will consider the evolution of photography in relationship to other art forms, including architecture, literature, painting, collage, video, performance, printmaking, and film. We will treat the photograph as an art historical document, and above all, interrogate the works as aesthetically resonant reflections of specific historical moments. This will be a rigorous critical examination of both canonical and non-canonical photographs, and we will work to link the "decisive moment" of the image to those social, political, cultural and intellectual moments in the past that informed their creation and reception. Students will be responsible for a series of presentations and papers, trips to Five College Museums, and a final student symposium on contemporary photography, including global perspectives.


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HACU-0193: Ancient Ireland

An introduction to the archaeology, myth, history, art, literature, and religion of ancient Ireland: 4000 BCE to 1200 CE, from the earliest megalithic monuments to the Norman conquest. Consideration will be given, then, to these distinct periods: Pre-Celtic (Neolithic and Bronze Ages--4000 BCE-700 BCE); Pre-Christian Celtic (Late Bronze & Iron Ages--700 BCE-400 CE); and Early Christian Celtic (Irish Golden Ages and Medieval--700-1200 CE). The emphasis throughout will be on the study of primary material, whether artifacts or documents. Readings will include: selections from the Mythological, Ulster, and Finn Cycles; The Voyage of St. Brendan; The History and Topography of Ireland by Giraldus Cambrensis; the writings of Patrick; and selections from early Irish poetry and hagiography.


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HACU-0197: Post-45 U.S. Literatures

This course explores a broad range of United States literatures from the post-World War II period to the present. We will traverse a range of literary forms (prose, poetry, essay, drama, comics), trends (e.g., postmodernism, Black Arts), and periods (e.g., the Cold War, the Vietnam era, the post-9/11 period).


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HACU-0199: Division I/II Independent Projects in Humanities and Cultural Studies

This course is intended as a research- and writing-intensive seminar for first- and second-year students interested in pursuing independent projects in the humanities, broadly conceived, but focusing on the analysis of primary texts (e. g., literature, still and moving images, new media). During the first half of the semester, we will establish a foundation in readings selected from among canonical and recent texts in cultural theory and criticism. The second half of the semester will focus on the process of developing a substantial independent research project in five stages: prospectus, annotated bibliography, detailed outline, draft and revision. Peer review workshops will be a key component of the course, complemented by library research sessions and instruction in effective argumentation. Interested students should bring a one-page proposal to the first class meeting.


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HACU-0203: Group Improvisation: Introduction to Creative Dance

Group Improvisation: Introduction to Creative Dance: Dance Pioneer Barbara Mettler said, "To create means to make up something new." In this course students explore the elements of dance through a series of creative problems solved through improvisations by individuals and groups. Directed exercises are used to heighten awareness of the body and its movement potential. Studies using the sounds of voice, hands and feet develop skills in accompaniment. Based on the principle that dance is a human need this work invites people of all ages and abilities to come together in movement and to make dance an element of their lives.


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HACU-0205: American Strings: Old Time and Bluegrass

This course focuses on American southern old-time string band music, bluegrass, and early country song. We will draw on cultural theory to explore the growth of these musics throughout the 20th century as well as the influences of gender, music revivalism, and African-American musical expression. We will consider old time and bluegrass both from an historical perspective and as vital forms in communities today. There will be an off-campus fieldwork, weekly reading and listening assignments, and regular written assignments. This course also has a performance component: students will learn to play old time music by ear and develop a repertoire of dance music. Prior experience with old time and bluegrass is not necessary, but a basic working knowledge of one of the following instruments is required: fiddle (violin), banjo, guitar, upright bass, mandolin, harmonica, and other appropriate instruments. A painless audition in the first week of class will determine eligibility.


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HACU-0206: Design Investigations

This is an introductory studio for those students interested in exploring the design fields: architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and product design. These fields all share a studio based approach to problem solving that is at once spatial, material, conceptual and social. In practice today, this also necessitates considering sustainability issues in the broadest sense from the very beginning of the design process. Over the course of the semester, students will be given a series of projects that will introduce visual and spatial thinking and communication. Emphasis will be placed upon developing a conceptual approach to a problem and investigating a design process that may lead to surprising and unexpected outcomes. Projects will increase in scope and complexity over the course of the semester. Specific projects will address issues of materiality, structure, mass, light, and the peripatetic experience. All projects will be presented in a studio critique format with drawings and models conveying the intent of the design project. Note: this course is a pre-requisite for all advanced architectural design courses. This course satisfies the Division I distribution requirement.
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HACU-0207: Dance Performance Lab

This will be a laboratory in which student dancers of diverse idioms and levels will work with student choreographers to create and bring to life new dances for performance in Hampshire Dance Program concerts. In weekly rehearsals, students will learn, practice, modify, interpret and polish the distinct dance style and vision of the choreographer. In addition, students will be expected to practice the evolving dance independently outside of rehearsals, to keep a journal of their discoveries and notes on the dance, to contribute to the choreographer's project, and to meet with other lab participants periodically for performance and review of the work in progress. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll concurrently in a dance technique course. Participation in this lab will be based on being selected by the choreographers for new works-in-progress. Prerequisite: for students dancing in a work choreographed for Hampshire Dance Program concerts.
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HACU-0209/HACU-0209-2: Video I: Live!

Video I is an introductory video production course. Over the course of the semester students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production techniques as well as learn to think and look critically about the making of the moving image. We will engage with video as a specific visual medium for expression with a specific focus on live-ness in time-based media in direct action, installation, and performance. The thematic focus of this course will critically engage issues of presence, process, technology, the body, and site. Also of importance is the nature of video as an immediate, electronic technology. Labs, workshops, sketches + exercises are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in the video medium  to facilitate experimentation and support imaginative risk taking in media production. Collaborations across discipline, research projects, and two public showcases will provide a platform for student's to explore and activate their artistic process in this medium. Readings, screenings, In-class critiques and discussion will focus on the relationship between form and content and the role of technology in image production. Prerequisite: 1 intro media production course or equivalent, any introductory course in digital, visual, media, or performing arts and/or creative writing; 1 critical or cultural studies course; recommended: 1 200 level course in either the humanities or social sciences.


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HACU-0210/HACU-0210-2: Film Workshop I

This course teaches the basic skills of film production, including camera work, editing, sound recording, and preparation and completion of a finished work in film and video. Students will submit weekly written responses to theoretical and historical readings and to screenings of films and videotapes, which represent a variety of aesthetic approaches to the moving image. There will be a series of filmmaking assignments culminating in an individual final project for the class. The development of personal vision will be stressed. The bulk of the work in the class will be produced in 16mm format. Video formats plus digital image processing and non-linear editing will also be introduced. Prerequisite courses include a 100 level course in media arts (Introduction to Media Arts, Hampshire Media Arts, or equivalent and must be completed and not concurrent with this course.)


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HACU-0211/HACU-0211-2: Still Photography I: Black and White Analog-Medium and Large Format

This course emphasizes three objectives: first, the acquisition of basic photographic skills, including composition, exposure, processing, and printing in the black and white darkroom; second, familiarity with historical and contemporary movements in photography and the development of visual literacy; third, the development of individual artistic methods and goals. This course will be taught using medium and large format cameras. Cameras will be available through media services. Students will have weekly shooting and printing assignments and, in addition, will complete a portfolio by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: 100 level course in Introduction to Media Arts, any art, photo or film history/theory course, or another art class (drawing, painting, sculpture, film) Required lab: 2 hours outside of class time per week.
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HACU-0216: Contemporary Dance Technique 4: High Intermediate

This will be a high intermediate-level class intended for students with two years of training. The focus of the work will be on continuing to refine the kinesiological perception and theoretical understanding of efficient movement in order to increase accuracy, speed and mobile strength. Attention will also be given to developing performance and interpretation skills. Prerequisite: previous study of dance technique. Level will be assessed during the first week of classes.
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HACU-0219: The Soviet Jewish Experience

In this course we will examine the history and culture of the Jews of the Soviet Union, once one of the largest and most diverse Jewish communities in the world. Beginning with the Bolshevik Revolution, we will explore the dramatic transformations of daily life in the world's first socialist state, and investigate the changing contours of Jewish identity in the region through the eras of Stalinism, Stagnation, perestroika and up to the present day. How is Jewishness defined in a state where the practice of Judaism is officially discouraged? How do historians understand a society under surveillance, where the reliability of the documents left behind is always in question? To better understand these paradoxes, we will consider the following themes in particular: the place of Jews as a minority in Soviet society; anti-Semitism; the interplay of ideology and everyday life; Russian and Yiddish culture; the survival of religion in an officially atheist state; migration; memory, nostalgia, and the longing for home. Special emphasis will be placed on innovative primary source analysis, as students engage with a variety of rich and sometimes unusual research materials including: fiction, film, memoirs, secret diaries, propaganda, oral histories, music, digital exhibits, and other texts. All readings in English.
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HACU-0220: The Good Story: How Narratives Work

How do narratives function? What are the basic elements that combine to create a "good story"? This course will address these and other questions in an effort to provide students interested in reading and writing short fiction, film and theatrical scripts with the fundamental skills necessary for analyzing and creating successful narratives. Close readings will seek to reveal how writers are able to grip an audience's attention by building narrative questions, how plots are structured both within scenes and across an entire work, how resonant dialogue can effectively manage to impart information and create subtext, and how characters relate to plot. Classes will combine textual analysis, writing instruction, and peer review. A 100-level writing-intensive course is recommended but not required.


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HACU-0222: Modernity and the Avant-Gardes

This course is an examination of the emergence, development, and dissolution of European modernist art, architecture and design. The course begins with the innovations and collisions of early twentieth century art, in response to the growth of modern urbanism, industrialist production, colonialist politics, and psychological experimentation, and ends with the cooptation of modernist radicalism in the wake of World War II. Distinctions between the terms modernist, modernity, threshold modernism, and the avant-garde will be explored as we unpack the complex equations between art, politics and social change in the first half of the twentieth century. Covering selected movements and groups (such as Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Bauhaus, De Stijl, Constructivism, and New Objectivity) this course will consider themes such as mechanical reproduction, nihilism, nationalism, consumerism, and primitivism as they are disclosed in the making and reception of modern art. Students will be responsible for presentations, essays, a research paper and museum visits.


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HACU-0225: Southern Literature and History

Constructed as almost a mythic fiction by its own major novelists and historians and stereotyped in the popular media, the US "South" is also a set of multiple stories told by former slaves and slave holders, by women and men working in factories and mines, fields and homes. Through analysis of fiction, autobiography and some films, together with reference to debates in the current historical scholarship, this course introduces you to South(s) of starkly contrasting geographies and economies. We will trace themes that span the period from the 1880's to the 1990's: the aftermath of slavery, war and Reconstruction; the roles of family, religion, memory and myth-making; the tensions of poverty, individualism, and community; the growing split between rural and urban life; the relations among classes, races and sexes; the impact of and reaction to Civil Rights and to other Twentieth Century liberation movements.


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HACU-0228: Mind in the Material World

Mind in the Material World will draw on texts from Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. We will examine the fundamental distinction between mind and matter as it is initially proposed by Descartes and later challenged by Leibniz; the argument against the existence of matter as it appears in Berkeley; skepticism about the very nature of substance, whether material or spiritual, as it occurs in Locke and Hume; and, finally, the conceptions of mind, particularly as this concerns rationality and selfhood, which are developed by each of these thinkers. Texts: Descartes Meditations and Principles; Leibniz's Discourse on Metaphysics; excerpts from Locke's Essay; Berkeley's Three Dialogues; and excerpts from Hume's Treatise.
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HACU-0229: Houses, Brothels & Luxury Goods: The Lives & Afterlives of Ancient Pompeii

Destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE, Pompeii preserves traces of every aspect of life from shop signs and graffiti to a temple of the Egyptian goddess Isis to richly decorated houses. This course will focus on analyzing that material culture record to see what it can reveal about the town's social and economic structure, its politics, patterns of worship, its places of entertainment, and its burgeoning sex industry. Of equal importance will be the rediscovery of the site in 1748 and the creative reconstructions and fictions it has generated since from lurid nineteenth century paintings and novels to films and an episode of Dr. Who. The marketing of Pompeii in recent blockbuster museum exhibitions and the politics of the preservation of a site, which is rapidly disintegrating will also be subjects for discussion and research.
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HACU-0231: Dancefilm: Choreography and the Moving Image

Moving nimbly between dance history and film theory, big mainstream movies and small experimental films, this course is an exploration of the choreographic in cinema. We will trace the history of the dance film form from its earliest manifestation in the silent film era, through the historic avant garde, musicals and music videos to contemporary short dance films, showing how the combination of dance and film produces cine-choreographic practices that are specific to the dance film form. This course, which combines theory and practice, invites video and film concentrators, dancers, and dance-makers interested in exploring new frontiers of choreography on film.
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HACU-0232: Asian Spirituality in the West

This course will examine the life and teachings of influential Asian spiritual leaders in the West such as Thich Nhat Hanh and His Holiness the Dalai Lama. In addition, our examination will also extend to well-known American spiritual teachers influenced by Eastern traditions including Tara Brach, Eckhart Tolle, Jack Kornfield, and Ken Wilber. The course will also discuss a number of important issues pertaining to the philosophy of non-duality, spiritual materialism, the counterculture movement of 1960s, and Buddhism in the US.


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HACU-0233: Media Overload: Digital-Age Reflections on the Explosion of Print

This course investigates the eighteenth-century explosion of print from a new media perspective. From Swift's alarm at the deluge of hack writers to Austen's interest in characters who confuse a gothic novel for news reporting the outbreak of revolution, the seminar investigates anxiety surrounding writing's capacity to change identities, social formations, and power relations. In order to make sense of Byron's ambivalence about the "small drop of ink. which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think," the course explores the history of discomfort with the culture of print and its technology of writing. Today a similar kind of uneasiness is on the rise as the internet obliges readers to become writers themselves through email, social networking, wikis, blogs, and the like. Given our heightened awareness about the impact of social media, the course juxtaposes past and present concerns about what text does to us.
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HACU-0235: Between Worlds: U.S. Latino/a Caribbean Fiction

Contemporary Caribbean-U.S. Latino/a fictions portray authors and protagonists caught in a bind. They face the pressures of assimilation into mainstream American culture. On the other, they are all bound to a language other than American English and to memories of the lands of origin. Due to the proximity of these birthplaces (Dominican Republic, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico) to New York, Miami, Chicago, protagonists and authors often idealize la familia as the source of identity and salvation. How are these predicaments resolved? What mechanisms of desire and denial are projected? How are origins re-inscribed? Will be some of the questions that guide our readings and discussions. Possible authors include Edward Rivera, Sandra Cisneros, Junot Díaz, Loida Maritza Pérez, Rosario Ferré, Cristina García, and Carlos Eire. This course satisfies the Division I distribution requirement.


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HACU-0239: Jazz Improvisation Orchestra

This is a performance-oriented course, culminating in a concert at the end of the semester. Each student will be challenged to develop his or her skills as an ensemble musician and as a soloist. Our goal is to create a dynamic performance ensemble. Full attendance is crucial to this work. We will look at this seminal body of music from diverse angles, both in historical context and in contemporary re-imaginings. We will work to meet its technical challenges and to internalize its essence, so crucial to the African-American musical tradition. Each student will make a contract of individual goals to focus on in the context of the Jazz Improvisation Orchestra. Improvisation and composition, re-composition and arranging are all part of the mix. The Jazz Improvisation Orchestra is open to all instruments, including voice. Prerequisite: Jazz Improvisation Seminar I (HACU 0192) or comparable 5-college class.


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HACU-0241: Transcultural Manipulations: Translation Workshop

What difference does it make to read Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky's translation of Anna Karenina or Constance Garnett's? The King James Bible or the New English version? The fact that multiple translations exist implies that translation, like any form of writing, involves a series of choices. The goal of this course is to examine the possibilities translators face, the factors that motivate and influence their decisions, and the resulting effects of those decisions, so that you as translators can develop your language, literary and cultural skills. Readings dealing with the history and theory of the practice of translation and its political and ethical consequences will provide a framework for our discussions. Students will undertake a translation project in which they will produce an original translation and an analysis of the choices they faced. Course requirement: students must demonstrate at least intermediate proficiency in a language other than English.
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HACU-0244: Personal Essay

The rigors of academia mandate that we write in one form or another for most of the first 21 years of our lives. After that we write to get jobs and to keep them, we write to engage in the commerce of our culture, and we write to communicate with others and with ourselves. This last genre is perhaps the least practiced but among the most important since writing is a process that helps us make meaning. Writing is both a verb and a noun; it represents our best thinking and helps us arrive at it. The irony of the term, the personal essay, is in learning to make rhetorical choices to help us to develop our own literary and personal values and the experiences that helped to generate them we begin a journey that ultimately takes us beyond ourselves and into the community, which can establish our common humanity. In this class we will learn and practice the elements of the personal essay, including narrative, character, setting, dialogue, and how they fit together to create a thematic whole.
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HACU-0246: Art History and Popular/Visual Culture

How many times has Edvard Munch's The Scream (1893) been referenced in film and/or advertising and what makes it recognizable? How do artists such as Barbara Kruger use the strategies of advertising to create high art? How else have high and low culture merged and reverberated? Why have van Gogh, Klimt, and Mondrian become source material for fashion designers, tattoo artists, and even liquor makers? Why do art historians and archeologists figure so frequently in popular novels and other non-academic media? Why are we fascinated with an object's provenance and artists who "sample" other artists? How does copyright function in a world of endless reproduction and social media? This course will examine the ways that the art historical concerns with iconography, canonicity, style and context, the cult of the artist as genius/fallen hero(ine), arts economics, and other issues underlie the ways that art, artists and art history have entered arenas outside of art history and it will examine how the study of popular and visual culture has shifted the field of art production and art history. This course satisfies the Division I Distribution Requirement.


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HACU-0248: Literature in the Time of Terror

Literature in the Age of Terror undertakes a cultural study of terror that reaches from the French Revolution to the twenty-first century.  The course argues that our specifically political use of the words “terror” and “terrorism” emerged alongside a late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century fascination with anxiety, paranoia, and panic to form part of a broad historical phenomenon that literary scholars call Romanticism. 

By putting Romantic-era literature into dialogue with present-day debates about terrorism, 9/11, and the Global War on Terror, the course asks students to critically reflect on contemporary culture from a literary-historical perspective.  Key units address the rhetoric and aesthetics of terror as well as the politics of paranoia and the experience of everyday war.  Along the way, students refine their skill at close reading, applying a theory, and drawing a historical comparison.  We spend the second half of the semester preparing for a mini conference, in which students present their ongoing research as they would at a national meeting of a scholarly organization. 


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HACU-0251: Themes of Black Resistance and Black Oppression in Black Literature, Culture, and Life

"Formations of Black Subjection and Scenes of Resistance" departs from Saidiya Hartman's book Scenes of Subjection in its exploration, identification, and interrogation of formations of black subjection and resistance to subjection from the eighteenth century to the present. We will perform close readings of literature, law, and various cultural texts, forms of sociality, and spatial arrangements by and through which racialized, gendered, and socio-economic class-based forms of subjection and coercion have been constructed and are in some instances still maintained. We will engage the problem of resistance-its wily definitions and expressions, conditions of possibility, potentiality, and limits. And we will look in both common and unexpected places, mining how discourses of liberty, freedom, egalitarianism, resistance, and even empathy, humanitarianism, inclusiveness, and joy can become leveraged strategically as vehicles for subjection and problematic exclusions. Requirements: presentations, research- papers, independent projects, attendance.
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HACU-0254: Still Photography II: The Body and the Frame

The human form; nude, naked, clothed, full bodies, partial bodies, gendered and racial bodies, young and old bodies constitute a primary subject in contemporary artistic practice. In this class we will explore both the traditions of the photographic nude in art and its subversions in late 20th and 21st century photography. Students will be expected to develop a "body" of photographs related to the topic that can intersect anywhere with the body: straight portraiture, nudes, abstractions of bodies or virtual Web bodies. Students will be instructed to use cameras, computers and materials to develop an aesthetic strategy that either embraces or challenges existing genres. Instructor Permission.
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HACU-0255: Video II: Say Everything-The Essay Film

According to Timothy Corrigan, the essayistic film “describes the many-layered activities of a personal point of view as a public experience”. In this theory/practice class, we will explore the exciting and ever-impossible-to-define genre of the essay film. Alongside weekly readings and film screenings students will independently produce essay-style films.

Because the essay film has its roots in the literary essay, we will devote a considerable amount of time to writing. Most classes will begin with a writing exercise, followed by a discussion of the writing. Alongside the weekly films we will read both literary and academic essays to further develop our understanding of the various forms the essay takes.

The course will culminate in students producing a 15-minute essay film.


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HACU-0258: Literature and Psychoanalysis: Reading the Case History

Freud remarked that his case histories read like short stories, and it was this intersection of genres that allowed him to arrive at an understanding of the suffering of his patients. The reading and writing of case histories, whether legal, medical, or psychological, give us access to the way narrative forms come to structure and determine our lives. The case history proceeds on two registers-a written text that also includes its own interpretation, its own reading-which gives it a special connection to the study of literature and literary interpretation. In this course, we will start by reading Freud's case histories and proceed to a cross-cultural selection of modern novels and stories alongside psychoanalytic theory. The following questions will guide our reading: How does the case history allow us to imagine the limits of normativity? How does it allow us to rethink the place of character in fiction? Can a literary text be treated as a case history? Can the case history, as a practical attempt to ease the suffering of a patient, teach us something about the relation of the body to writing?
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HACU-0259: Capstone Architectural Design Studio

This is an advanced architectural studio class for DIV III and other students with a design background, both in terms of familiarity with architectural representation and principles of architectural design. Throughout this course students develop individual design projects they propose. Their work is assessed every week through desk reviews and pin-up critiques. A considerable amount of self-directed work outside of class hours is expected from students.
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HACU-0261: Language, Power, and Difference: Approaches to Semiotics

How does language produce "meaning" and when does language "slip" and/or "fail"? Why do certain words and images affect, attract, or repel entire populations and leave others indifferent? When does language create difference and become an instrument of power? What ideological functions does it serve in colonial and neocolonial contexts? We will address these questions by examining classical and contemporary debates and perspectives on semiotics-the study of signs and symbols as elements of language and communication-as well as globally relevant political phenomena that demonstrate both the uniting and divisive nature of linguistic (and visual) expression. We will not only examine theories of meaning production derived from literary studies, media studies, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial studies but also apply these approaches to analyze semiotically charged contemporary phenomena such as postcolonial bilingualism, "accent training" in multinational call centers, the Danish cartoon controversy, and the burqa ban in France.


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HACU-0262: Pixel, Sample, Grain: History and Practice of AV Preservation and Archiving

The moving image is a pervasive presence in current culture but film and video history is threatened by the instability of its material existence. Digitization does not solve the problem of the medium's impermanence and the transition from celluloid to digital production and distribution only adding further layers to the medium's ephemerality. This course will explore issues of film preservation by viewing a wide range of films that have been preserved or restored, especially independent films from narrative, documentary and avant-garde cinemas. We will analyze films from historical and theoretical perspectives while considering the issues facing film archivists and conservators in preserving them. From a detailed study and critical research of films, students will write descriptive and analytical essays. They will also keep a weekly response journal to assigned screenings and readings. Students must have completed a cinema studies course and a course in film or video production. Instructor Permission required.
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HACU-0263: Photography From Asia

In the 1840's, shortly after the invention of photography, British, European and American photographers traveled to the Far and Near East, often on the heels of military aggression. In the process, they introduced photography to these regions, where local practitioners quickly took up the medium and used it for their own purposes. Yet history of photography texts do not adequately register the rich photographic traditions developed by photographers in Asia, and the current outpouring of photographic work from Asia countries demands a fuller historical context. In this course, we will study the development of photographic practices in Northeast, Southeast and South Asia. Collectively, through research, writing and the examination of historical and contemporary work, the class will assemble a fuller "picture" of photography in Asia, thereby expanding the framework of the history of photography in general.


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HACU-0264: Tonal Theory I

This course is for students with the solid knowledge of Western music fundamentals including the proficiency with staff notation. After a quick rigorous review of these basics, we delve deeper into functions of diatonic harmony, beginning with two-voice species counterpoint composition with basic melodic embellishments. The class then proceeds to four-part harmony and voicing techniques. In this section, we also explore relationship between cadences and forms; students compose a four-voice chorale using a binary form. In the last section, students engage in a more comprehensive multi-level analysis: harmonic, contextual, motivic, hypermetric, and formal. For their final, students apply the knowledge to analyze a minuet in a basic ternary form and compose their own for the instrumentation of their choice. In addition to the regular class meetings, participation in the weekly ear training is mandatory. Prerequisite: HACU 119 Musical Beginnings or equivalent AND the placement test in the first class.


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HACU-0273: Sonic Philosophy

This course will take sound and the sonic arts as both an object of inquiry and a provocation for thought. Reading texts by philosophers and cultural theorists, and examining work by composers, sound artists, writers, and filmmakers, we will investigate the ontology of sound and music, the nature of listening, technologies of audio recording and dissemination, time and space in the sonic arts, synaesthesia, and other issues. Each class will involve both discussions of theoretical texts and analysis of sonic art works. Readings by Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Russolo, Cage, Cutler, Kittler, Dolar, Serres, Barthes, McCaffery, Deleuze, Goodman, O'Callaghan, and others. Sounds by Lucier, Amacher, Young, Kubisch, Marclay, Fowler, Winderen, De Boer, Kubick & Walsh, Hecker, and others.
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HACU-0278: Ancient Greek and Indian Drama

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the dramatic traditions and texts of classical Greek and classical Sanskrit theater. From the classical Athenian corpus, selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, as well as comedies by Aristophanes and Menander, will be considered in depth. From the classical Indian tradition, we will read works by Bhasa, Kalidasa, and Shudraka. Special attention will be paid to the historical context of each play and to considerations of staging, ancient and modern.


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HACU-0279: Decoding Zen Buddhism: Philosophy, History and Practice

According to D.T. Suzuki, one of the most influential Zen Buddhist teachers of the 20th century, Zen is not a system of philosophy, religion, mysticism, nihilism, or even Buddhism. He says, "Zen has nothing to teach us in the way of intellectual analysis; nor has it any set doctrines which are imposed on its followers for acceptance." Then what is Zen? More importantly, what led D.T. Suzuki to teach Zen Buddhism in this way? This course will start by reading a number of popular books on Zen Buddhism in America, followed by a close analysis of their tenets. We will then move on to study Mahayana Buddhist philosophy and Daoist thought, which influenced the rise of Zen Buddhism. We will also explore Koan and Zazen meditation practices, Zen lineage, monasticism and Satori (Enlightenment) experience. Finally, the course will focus on late 19th and early 20th century Japanese Buddhist history, which is intimately tied to a particular interpretation of Zen Buddhism by D.T. Suzuki and other modern Zen masters in America.
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HACU-0280: The Post-Racial State: Ideology, Politics and the Media

In the wake of Obama's historic presidency, the American media triumphantly declared that we are living in post-racial times. But is race dead? Are we color-blind? If so, how do we explain the persistence of racism and racial inequality in the US? Utilizing an interdisciplinary amalgam of Ethnic Studies, Critical Race Theory, Media Studies, US Third World Feminism, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Political Philosophy, and Post-Colonial Theory, this course will investigate how "race" continues to shape American society in the post-civil rights era. Topics to be covered include: the social construction of race, racial formation, panethnicity, class-based and gendered racialization, multiculturalism, neoliberalism, double-consciousness, colonialism, essentialism, institutional racism, commodification of race/ethnicity, identity politics, colorblind ideology, cultural appropriation, resistance, and citizenship. Particular attention will be paid to affirmative action, immigration, hate speech, hate crimes, reparations, racial profiling, and the resurgence of white supremacy. This course is reading-, writing-, and theory-intensive. Prerequisite: Division II and III students only.

REQUIRED TEXTS:  All readings are available via the course website, clips via the PRS YouTube Channel.

 

 


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HACU-0285: Laban Movement Analysis

Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is a dynamic system for describing, classifying and understanding human movement. Developed by Rudolf Laban, an important scholar and visionary in the field of movement studies, LMA addresses both quantitative and qualitative characteristics of movement. Through study and physical exploration of Body, Space, Effort and Shape concepts, students will examine their own movement patterns and preferences (with the potential for expanding personal repertoire), and develop skill in observing and analyzing the movement of others within a range of artistic, social and cultural contexts. The course material is of value to students working in a range of disciplines (such as dance, theater, psychology, education, physical education, non-verbal communication, kinesiology, anthropology, cultural studies, etc.) and there will be ample opportunity for exploration and application of LMA concepts to a wide range of individual interests. Prior experience in dance or other kinds of movement trainings are welcomed but not required, however students must be willing to engage fully and energetically in all the movement activities.


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HACU-0287: Performance and Directing for Film, Video and Installation

This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The emphasis will be on development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance from artists including Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, Ousmane Sembene, The Wooster Group, Nagisa Oshima, John Cassavetes, and Eija Liisa Ahtila among others. Instructor permission required.


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HACU-0289: Mystics and Texts

No issue in the comparative history of religion dramatizes the challenges of cross-cultural study of religious mysticism." Is the mystic a kind of lone ranger of the soul whose experience reveals and confirms the transcendental unity of all religions, or are the experiences of mystics entirely predetermined by the mystics' respective contexts of history, tradition, language, and culture? What is the relation between the mystic's "interior" experiences and what he or she writes about them? In this course we will undertake a comparative study of "mystical" and scriptural texts representing Christian, Hindu, and Buddhist traditions within the framework of modern and contemporary critical contributions to the history, psychology, and philosophy of mysticism. Among the mystics and texts considered are: The Cloud of Unknowing, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, selected Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, Mirabai, Ramakrishna, Milarepa, and Dogen. Prerequisite: at least one course in the study of religion or philosophy. Instructor Permission required.


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HACU-0291: Adventures in Reproduction

Designed to provide an intensive, advanced studio experience for intermediate art students working in any media, this seminar explores contemporary art making by emphasizing reproduction and quotation within unique and editioned works. Students will make meaning with traditional and new media that may include explorations in paint, sculptural form, drawing, photography, book arts, installation, and video. Students will combine unique and mechanically reproduced marks, gestures, surfaces, and imagery using logics of pictorial space, pattern, reference, and self-reference. Models will include such artists as Luc Tuymans, Beth Campbell, Sonia Delaunay, Yinka Shonibare, Kevin Zucker, Andrew Kuo, Richard Prince, Frances Stark, Allan McCollum, Ann Craven, Gareth Long, Oliver Laric, and Jasper Johns among others. The majority of course work will be based on each student's proposed, semester-long series, although there also will be prompts and assignments. Attendance is required at the weekly class meetings, which will be devoted primarily to discussions, critiques, workshops, and presentations. Student should expect to work at least 6-8 hours outside of class on their projects. Prerequisite: At least three studio art classes. Lab fee $50. 


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HACU-0295: Religion, Magic, and the Shakespearean Stage

Religious rituals, black magic, and theatrical entertainment were linked by controversy in Shakespeare's England: were they potent acts or empty performances? How did they seduce and endanger unwitting audiences? Foregrounding the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, we will explore the intersecting cultural histories of religious persecution, witchcraft trials, and movements to close down the theaters. We will consider how England's religious culture was destabilized not only by the Protestant Reformation but also by global trade and travel, which increasingly exposed the English to Islam, Judaism and other religions of the world. To what extent did audiences believe in the power of Othello's witchcraft, Prospero's conjuring, or Paulina's miraculous resurrection? Why was theatrical enactment considered so dangerous? Our focus will extend beyond the interpretation of simple representational allusions to grapple with the particular semiotics of theatrical performance. Plays include The Winter's Tale, Macbeth, The Merchant of Venice, Pericles, The Renegado, The Witch of Edmonton, Dr. Faustus, and others. Prerequisite: At least one previous literature course.
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HACU-0299: Division II Independent Projects in Film, Photography, Video and Installation

This course will provide an opportunity for Division II students in film/video, photography and related media that wish to pursue their own work, creating at least one completed new project for inclusion in the Division II portfolio. Each student will be required to present his/her work to the group several times during the semester. The members of the workshop will provide critical, technical and crew support for one another. Team projects are supported as long as each participant has a distinct and responsible role in the making of that work. Technical workshops will be offered where necessary. However, prior to joining the workshop, students must have some level of mastery over his/her medium as well as course evaluations in prerequisite areas. We will unpack the conceptual process of creating and realizing new works. Readings, screenings and museum/gallery visits, which address the specific problems faced by class members in developing the works-in-progress, will contribute to the overall experience of the workshop. All of these activities including active verbal contributions to all sessions are required of each student under the guiding principle that tracking each other's intellectual and creative process will help each person develop their respective project.This course provides a structured context in which to do independent work at the Division II-level. Prerequisites: evaluations from at least two courses in a related discipline. Instructor Permission Required
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HACU-0302: Applied Ethnomusicology

While ethnomusicology -- the study of music in culture -- has traditionally been relegated to the classroom, the field has, in recent years, spawned interest outside of the academy. Recognizing the importance of multicultural education and outreach, arts organizations, funders, and community groups are focusing on the public presentation of community musics for general audiences. Moreover, ethnomusicologists increasingly are discovering what we at Hampshire already know:  Non Satis Scire (to know is not enough). To this end, some ethnomusicologists engage in research that results in direct and tangible contributions to the communities in which they work. These initiatives include such diverse projects such as public health and HIV/AIDS education, community economic growth, and other concerns of cultural and musical sustainability.

This course examines the field of Applied (or "Engaged") Ethnomusicology through a survey of recent work and scholarship and through engaging in applied work in our community in the Pioneer Valley.


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HACU-0303: Contemporary Musical Practices

This course will engage the important compositional practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will compose music using post-tonal pitch systems, new scalar and chordal constructions, and expanded formal and textural possibilities. We will focus on the creation of new, non-traditional hierarchies within musical systems with regard to intervals, notions of consonance and dissonance, asymmetrical meters, non-metrical rhythm, and tuning. Students will also be encouraged to develop new compositional strategies through the examination of existing practices such as polytonality, serialism, pitch-class composition, minimalism, and indeterminacy. Prerequisite: Tonal Theory 2.
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HACU-0323: New Millennium Choreography

This course looks at the vast and diverse cultural and aesthetic landscape of dance performance in the millennium and the new breed of choreographers making cutting-edge works that pursue radically different methods, materials and strategies for provoking new ideas about dance, body, and corporeal aesthetics. Taking in the vast spectrum of new-age performance (live and virtualized), we will ask such questions as: How does non-narrative dance focus on the body as an instrument with unlimited possibilities, without the impetus of stories, emotions, ideas, specific external images? How do heterosexuality, homosexuality, and androgeny constitute a gender spectrum in new works? How do we watch and evaluate dances from culturally specific traditions? How, in improvisational performance, do we watch people moving with each other and in space when there is no clear beginning, middle, or end; and how is the viewer challenged to see the point of people balancing, lifting, falling, and rolling? How do community-based performances constitute a distinct sociopolitical theme in dance works? How do site-specific works illuminate the thematic content of a work and various spaces for the viewer? How do choreographers utilize technology, text, sets, and lighting in developing multidisciplinary performance art works? Lastly, and most importantly, how have millennial dance artists instigated new frames and viewing positions from which to understand how dance communicates; and how are they inspiring a new generation of self-and-socially conscious artists/activists who insist on speaking directly to their own generation?
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HACU-0330: American Studies Seminar: Theory and Practice

This seminar is intended for advanced Division II and Division III students whose concentration relates to notions of American national and cultural identity and/or to the study of U.S. histories, literatures, and cultures. The course will have two emphases. First, we will read theoretical, critical, and scholarly texts important to the practice of American Studies as an interdisciplinary field, with an emphasis on recent work that engages with ethnic studies, border studies, critical race theory, transnationalism, and the cultures of U.S. imperialism. Additionally, invited scholars from Hampshire and the Five Colleges will discuss their approaches to American Studies, and we will visit nearby archives at UMass, Amherst, and/or Smith. The second emphasis of the course is on research and presentation. Division III students will write, present, and revise a piece of their independent project; Division II students will design a research prospectus that could later provide the basis for a Division III project. Division II students should expect to arrive on the first day of class with a proposed research topic. This course will require approximately 8 hours of work outside of class per week. Prerequisite: previous work in American Studies or related discipline. Please email mhardesty@hampshire.edu for information about instructor permission.
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HACU-0360: Curatorial Seminar for Division III Students in the Visual Arts

This seminar is recommended to students in their final semester of Division III, concentrating in visual arts. The course will address curatorial questions of art on display beyond esthetic measures in close relation to upcoming final Division III presentations. Student works, considered perception of spaces on campus, rigorous review of exhibitions in the region and readings will inform the base from where students develop curatorial concepts for exhibition design, while providing a platform for discussion and meaningful criticism of student work in progress.


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HACU-0399: Film/Photography/Video Studies Seminar

Film/Photography/Video Studies Seminar: This course is open to film, photography and video concentrators in Division III and others by consent of the instructor. The class will attempt to integrate the procedural and formal concentration requirements of the College with the creative work produced by each student. It will offer a forum for meaningful criticism, exchange, and exposure to each other. In addition, various specific kinds of group experience will be offered, including lectures and critiques by guest artists. The course will include discussions of post- graduate options and survival skills including tips on exhibition and distribution, and graduate school applications. There will be a $50 lab fee. Enrollment is limited to Division III concentrators; contracts must have been filed prior to enrollment. All others must have permission of the instructor. NOTE: Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who do not attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster. Instructor permission required.
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HACU-1IND: Independent Study - 100 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
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HACU-2IND: Independent Study - 200 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
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HACU-3IND: Independent Study - 300 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
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