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CYL Fall Courses 2010



Cognitive Science

Culture, Brain, and Development: Developmental Psychopathology
J. Couperus

Until the last 10 years or so Autism, a disorder with known biological correlates, was almost unheard of. Why is this disorder suddenly so prevalent? Is it something in our culture? Our environment? Our genetics? This course will examine developmental psychopathologies such as ADHD, Conduct Disorder, Tourettes, and others from multiple perspectives. We will examine the role of culture, experience, and the brain in the development of these disorders using psychological and neuroscientific perspectives. Students do not need to have any specific background, but should be willing to read scientific articles and open to understanding not only the role of culture and society in development but the biological underpinnings as well. Students will be expected to read primary research, write several short papers, as well as complete a course-long project that will be presented to the class. This is a course in the Culture, Brain, and Development Program.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Adele Simmons Hall 222 SEM TTH 10:30-11:50 a.m.
CS-0105

Philosophy of Education
E. Alleva

This course explores central questions in the philosophy of education: What is education, and what is it for? What is the meaning and value of education to individuals and society? What should the aims and content of education be? Are there things that everyone should know or be able to do? Should education promote moral virtue? What are alternative methods of education? How should educational opportunities and resources be distributed? What roles should the individual, family, community, and state have in education? What should the role of education be in democratic societies? We will examine alternative perspectives on these and related issues of educational theory and practice. Readings will include selections from a variety of influential historical thinkers, such as Plato, Locke, Rousseau, and Dewey, as well as more recent educational theorists and critics, such as Illich and Kozol, among others.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Adele Simmons Hall 221 CRS MW 10:30-11:50 a.m. 
CS-117T

Trauma and Resilience: Working with Youth with Histories of Trauma
R. Davi
s
This course is intended for students planning on working in educational and/or care giving settings with children and adolescents who have been
exposed to traumatic events. Students will learn about multiple sources of trauma and their differential manifestations, including its neurobiological, psychological, behavioral, and social sequelae. Contemporary approaches to assessment and treatment of traumatized youth as well as an understanding of factors contributing to resilience in youth exposed to traumatic events will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: Students must have taken at least one prior psychology course. Experience working with youth is recommended
9/810-12/16/10 M 2:30-5:20 p.m. ASH 222
CS-0293

How People Learn
L. Wenk

As a result of interactions between cognitive psychology and education, we now have many ideas about classroom learning, and approaches to teaching, testing, and assessment. We also have strong evidence that implementing these ideas could really improve learning for all children and youth, including those who are under-resourced. In this seminar we will work to understand the findings by reading and discussing a selection of theoretical works from cognitive psychology and examine their practical applications to education through discussion and time observing classrooms or working directly with students. We will also learn how to evaluate educational claims. Students will be evaluated on 2-3 shorter papers and a longer final paper. There is a practicum associated with this class that requires 2-4 hours per week outside of class hours. This course can be used to satisfy the Educational Psychology requirement for licensure students. This course satisfies Division I distribution requirements.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Adele Simmons Hall 222 SEM TTH 2:00-3:20 p.m.
CS-0208


Humanity, Arts, Cultural Studies

Introduction to Ethnomusicology and Music Ethnography
R. Miller

As a discipline, ethnomusicology focuses on music as culture (e. g. punk as community) as well as the role of music in culture (e.g. calypso as a tool for political critique). Ethnomusicology is inherently interdisciplinary and draws variously on anthropology, history, performance studies, political science, and other fields. Central to ethnomusicology, though, is field research and its final product, the music ethnography -- a written study of a musical community. In this course, students will be introduced to ethnomusicology through an exploration of musical traditions as they relate to race, gender, power relations, identity formation, ritual, etc. In addition to weekly reading and listening assignments, students will learn basic fieldwork methodology (interviewing skills, audio documentation, etc.) and, over the semester in groups of two, will research and compile a music ethnography on a specific local musical community. In addition to individual fieldwork assignments, regular reading, and short paper assignments. Students will prepare a final 10-12 page written music ethnography. This course satisfies the Division I distribution requirement.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Music and Dance Building RECITAL SEM TTH 2:00-3:20 p.m.
HACU-0241

Special Topics in Childhood, Youth, and Learning
K. Luschen

An Integrated Division III Seminar: This seminar is designed for students pursuing a Division III project on a topic related to childhood, youth, or learning, and is appropriate for students whose primary work is in any of the five schools. We will begin the semester by considering the assumptions, perspectives, and methodologies involved in different disciplinary approaches to work related to childhood, young people, and/or education. Students will help select readings by selecting texts relevant to their area of focus. The remainder of the course will involve students' presentation of works in progress, peer editing, and sharing strategies for completing large independent projects. Assignments will include brief reaction papers, as well as a substantial longer piece of work that could be incorporated into the Division III project. This course is designed for students in the first or second semester of their Division III projects, and can be used as an advanced learning activity.:
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 104 CRS W 9:00-11:50 a.m.

HACU-0356
    Crosslisted with SS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with CS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with IA-0356-1
    Crosslisted with NS-0356-1

Interdisciplinary Arts

Arts Integration Across Cultures
J. Silver

In the U.S. mainstream culture, the arts are largely interpreted as an extra and as such not an integral part of the general education curriculum. The arts are often marginalized in our educational system, and almost always in jeopardy when budgets are cut. This is not the case in many other countries. In some cultures, the arts are valued like math, science, and other academic subjects, and they are a indispensable part of every general education curriculum. In tutorial course we will learn how arts integration is used and valued in the U.S and abroad, and we will explore how education systems throughout the world teach with the arts, through the arts and about the arts. All students will have the opportunity to learn through in-depth research and investigations. This is a project-based course, which will result in a final research paper. This course satisfies Division I distribution requirements.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Emily Dickinson Hall 2 CRS MW 10:30-11:50 a.m.
IA-168T

Engaging Learning through Theatre and the Arts: The Role of the Teaching Artist
P. Hellwig

This class is a dual exploration of the dynamic role of the teaching artist in public school classrooms, and the pedagogy of Arts Integration as a means to engage and inspire the creative process of learning. Arts Integration is a relatively new discipline in the field of education that integrates academic content with artistic expression to help students find personal connections to the subject they’re studying, thereby making learning meaningful and memorable. Participants will collaboratively explore a vast collection of theater games and other arts activities from multiple perspectives, investigating how they can serve to enhance social and academic learning, as well as creative and critical thinking. We will re-think curricula using arts integration activities, developed by Enchanted Circle Theater, across curricular boundaries from Plate Tectonics to the Civil War. Students will experiment with techniques for adapting theater-arts exercises to support standards-based topics in math, science, social studies and English language arts.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Emily Dickinson Hall 104 CRS WF 9:00-10:20 a.m.
IA-0169

Special Topics in Childhood, Youth, and Learning: An Integrated Division III Seminar
K. Luschen

This seminar is designed for students pursuing a Division III project on a topic related to childhood, youth, or learning, and is appropriate for students whose primary work is in any of the five schools. We will begin the semester by considering the assumptions, perspectives, and methodologies involved in different disciplinary approaches to work related to childhood, young people, and/or education. Students will help select readings by selecting texts relevant to their area of focus. The remainder of the course will involve students' presentation of works in progress, peer editing, and sharing strategies for completing large independent projects. Assignments will include brief reaction papers, as well as a substantial longer piece of work that could be incorporated into the Division III project. This course is designed for students in the first or second semester of their Division III projects, and can be used as an advanced learning activity.:
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 104 CRS W 9:00-11:50 a.m.
IA-0356
    Crosslisted with SS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with CS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with HACU-0356-1
    Crosslisted with NS-0356-1


Natural Science
   
Agriculture, Food, and Health
E. Conlisk

This hands-on course examines food in the broadest sense, from its production in the field to its complex role in health promotion and disease prevention. Students learn basic principals of agriculture, plant science, nutrition, and epidemiology, with an emphasis on the original research linking food and food production to human health. Readings for the class are drawn from the primary and secondary scientific literature and from agriculture and nutrition textbooks. Students also assist with the weekly vegetable harvest on Hampshire's organic farm and participate in a new initiative linking the farm with an inner-city school in Springfield. This is an ideal course for students who are serious about scientific inquiry, community service, and a few hours of farm work each week.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Cole Science Center 333 CRS MW 10:30-11:50 a.m.
NS-109T

Puzzles and Paradoxes
D. Kelly

It has been argued that puzzling is as intrinsic to human nature as humor, language, music, and mathematics. Zeno's paradoxes of motion and the liar and heap paradoxes ("This sentence is false," "Does one grain of sand change a non-heap into a heap?) have challenged thinkers for centuries; and other paradoxes have forced changes in philosophy, scientific thinking, logic, and mathematics. We'll read, write, and talk about the Riddle of the Sphinx, the Minotaur's Maze, the Rhind papyrus, Pythagorean mysticism, Archimedes' wheel, Fibonacci's rabbits, Durer's magic square, Konigsberg's bridges, Lewis Carroll, Sam Loyd, E.H. Dudeney, Mobius's band, Maxwell's Demon, Schrodinger's cat, Hempel's raven, the theorems of Kurt Godel and Kenneth Arrow, the Loony Loop, Rubik's cube, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the unexpected hanging, Russell, Berrocal, Christie, Escher, Borges, Catch-22, Sudoku, Gardner, Coffin, Kim, Smullyan, and Shortz. Recreational mathematics will pervade the course, and we'll grapple with irrationality, pigeonholes, infinity, and the 4th dimension. We'll discover, create, classify, share, enjoy, and be frustrated and amazed by lots of visual illusions, mechanical, take-apart, assembly, sequential, jigsaw, word, and logic puzzles. We'll hone our problem-solving skills and consider the pedagogic and social value of puzzles. Armed with examples and experience, we might find some possible answers to "what makes a puzzle 'good'?" and "why do people puzzle?"
Limited to First Year Students
9/8/10 12/16/10 Cole Science Center 333 CRS TTH 9:00-10:20 a.m.
NS-112T        

Special Topics in Childhood, Youth, and Learning: An Integrated Division III Seminar:
K. Luschen

This seminar is designed for students pursuing a Division III project on a topic related to childhood, youth, or learning, and is appropriate for students whose primary work is in any of the five schools. We will begin the semester by considering the assumptions, perspectives, and methodologies involved in different disciplinary approaches to work related to childhood, young people, and/or education. Students will help select readings by selecting texts relevant to their area of focus. The remainder of the course will involve students' presentation of works in progress, peer editing, and sharing strategies for completing large independent projects. Assignments will include brief reaction papers, as well as a substantial longer piece of work that could be incorporated into the Division III project. This course is designed for students in the first or second semester of their Division III projects, and can be used as an advanced learning activity.:
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 104 CRS W 9:00-11:50 a.m.
Instructor Permission Required
NS-0356
    Crosslisted with SS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with CS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with HACU-0356-1
    Crosslisted with IA-0356-1


Critical Social Inquiry

Poetry and the Playground
R. Conrad

In this course we will explore ideas about contemporary childhood in the U.S. through looking at evolving approaches to "poetry for children." In addition to reading in children's literature, we will read works in the history of childhood, folklore, education, and sociology that explore children's culture, poetry for young people, and approaches to writing poetry with young people. Students who enroll at the 300-level will engage with young people in reading and writing poetry in community-based learning outside of class time. Students enrolling at the 300-level are required to have a background in creative writing and childhood studies (e.g., SS 289 Poetry and Childhood). Enrollment at the 300 level is by instructor permission.  
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 101 CRS TTH 10:30-11:50 a.m.
SS-0123-1
Crosslisted with SS-0323

Girls in School: Feminisms and Educational Inequality
K. Luschen

The relationship of girls’ empowerment to education has been and continues to be a key feminist issue. Second wave liberal feminism, for instance, strove to make schools more equitable places for girls, demanding equal access and resources for girls and boys in schools and the elimination of discrimination specifically impacting girls. Yet the relationship of gender inequality and schooling is a complicated and contentious site of research and policy. In this course we will examine how various feminist perspectives have defined and addressed the existence of gender inequality in American schools. By analyzing research, pedagogies, policies and programs developed in the past few decades to address gender inequality and schooling, students should complete the course with a complex view of feminism and how these different, and at times contradictory, perspectives have contributed to the debates around educational inequality and the design of educational reform. Students enrolled in the course should expect to participate in a community-based learning component.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 101 SEM TTH 12:30-1:50 p.m.
SS-0166
    
Creative Memoir and the Invention of Self
A. Rogers

Who are we and how do we become ourselves? Intellectuals and artists have posed and tried to answer this question. In this course we'll explore the idea of crafting or inventing a self out of the materials of memory, the desire to become what we aspire to be (something that's always just beyond reach), and the art of creative expression. Each student will personally explore the genre of memoir writing through a series of essays and exercises in creative writing, with a focus on the art of writing. We will also look at the invention of self through scholarship on memory, subjectivity, time, and culture, and consider the unconscious, its elusiveness and power in shaping our stories.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 107 CRS TTH 12:30-1:50 p.m.
SS-0178

Ways of Knowing in the Social Sciences
K. Chang

This course will introduce students to the diverse methodologies employed in the social sciences, while critically considering the implications of methodology for the production of knowledge. What philosophical assumptions underlie our methodological choices? How does choice of method shape what we can know? Why are some methodologies privileged as more legitimate ways of knowing than others? When do methodological conventions work for or against other goals, such as community empowerment and social change? How can we make more intentional and creative methodological choices that recognize both the limits and the possibilities of knowing through engagement with others? Each week, a faculty guest speaker will share with the class a recent research project, focusing on the ?behind the scenes? stories of the methodological assumptions, dilemmas, and decisions that drove his/her research. Subsequent discussions will focus on this work in relation to the larger questions and themes of the course.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 101 CRS W 2:30-5:20 p.m.
SS-0204
    
Development Seminar
R. Conrad

What do we mean by human development? In this advanced seminar we will critically examine ideas of human development in recent work in developmental psychology, critical developmental psychology, cultural psychology, and interdisciplinary Childhood Studies. An important component of students’ work in this course will be to critically evaluate how the concept of “development” informs their own academic studies, including areas not listed above such as education, educational psychology, and developmental neuroscience. This course is limited to Division II and Division III students, and is recommended for students whose work intersects with the Childhood, Youth, and Learning (CYL) program and/or the Culture, Brain, and Development (CBD) program. Prerequisite: At least one previous course in Psychology. Limited to 18 students.
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 106 CRS TH 12:30-3:20 p.m.
SS-0298
Crosslisted with CS-0298-1

Poetry and the Playground
R. Conrad

In this course we will explore ideas about contemporary childhood in the U.S. through looking at evolving approaches to "poetry for children." In addition to reading in children's literature, we will read works in the history of childhood, folklore, education, and sociology that explore children's culture, poetry for young people, and approaches to writing poetry with young people. Students who enroll at the 300-level will engage with young people in reading and writing poetry in community-based learning outside of class time. Prerequisite: Students enrolling at the 300-level are required to have background in creative writing and childhood studies (e.g., SS 289 Poetry and Childhood). Enrollment at the 300 level is by instructor permission.
Instructor Permission Required
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 101 CRS TTH 10:30-11:50 a.m.
SS-0323
Crosslisted with SS-0123

Special Topics in Childhood, Youth, and Learning: An Integrated Division III Seminar
K. Luschen

This seminar is designed for students pursuing a Division III project on a topic related to childhood, youth, or learning, and is appropriate for students whose primary work is in any of the five schools. We will begin the semester by considering the assumptions, perspectives, and methodologies involved in different disciplinary approaches to work related to childhood, young people, and/or education. Students will help select readings by selecting texts relevant to their area of focus. The remainder of the course will involve students' presentation of works in progress, peer editing, and sharing strategies for completing large independent projects. Assignments will include brief reaction papers, as well as a substantial longer piece of work that could be incorporated into the Division III project. This course is designed for students in the first or second semester of their Division III projects, and can be used as an advanced learning activity.
Instructor Permission Required
9/8/10 12/16/10 Franklin Patterson Hall 104 CRS W 9:00-11:50 a.m.
SS-0356
    Crosslisted with CS-0356-1
    Crosslisted with HACU-0356-1
    Crosslisted with IA-0356-1
    Crosslisted with NS-0356-1


 
 

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