class_meeting
 

Interdisciplinary Arts Course Web Sites

Spring Term 2014 Courses

CSI/IA-0253: Disturbing Desire: Proust, Woolf, Lacan

In this course we will read writers who disturb experiences of memory, perception, the body and desire itself, rupturing a familiar, stable 'reality', and offering in its stead the elusive workings of the unconscious. The fiction of Proust and Woolf uniquely leaves a trace of this process of disturbance, a rich vein of language in which each maps and remaps the shifting shoreline of consciousness and desire - processes that change engagement with the world. Their work interrogates the routines and habits that disallow ambivalence and fluidity. Each explores spaces from which change can emerge, as the closure of social conventions and habits of gender become productively disturbed and critically remapped. In Lacan's work, we will explore desire as founded in radical loss and lack, the chaining of signifiers in language as key to the way the unconscious reveals itself, and creativity as a particular response to desire. Students should anticipate a challenging reading process. After engaging with the texts and responding to the art of Proust and Woolf through discussion and short papers, each student will undertake a creative project of her or his own and write about their process of creativity. Readings will include Woolf's short fiction, To the Lighthouse and The Waves; readings from Proust's The Way by Swann?s and In the shadow of Young Girls in Flower, and excerpts from The Prisoner and the Fugitive and Time Regained (using new Penguin edition translations), as well as Lacanian theories of sexuality and selections from Lacan?s crits.
Go to the course website.


IA-0103: Introduction to Writing

This course will explore the work of scholars, essayists, and creative writers in order to use their prose as models for our own. We'll analyze scholarly explication and argument, and we'll appreciate the artistry in our finest personal essays and short fiction. Students will complete a series of critical essays in the humanities and natural sciences and follow with a personal essay and a piece of short fiction. Students will have an opportunity to submit their work for peer review and discussion; students will also meet individually with instructor. Frequent, enthusiastic revision is an expectation. This course is intended largely for first year students, though third semester/fourth semester students struggling with writing issues are welcome.
Go to the course website.


IA-0105: Machine Shop Instruction

This course will offer a basic knowledge of machine shop practices and procedures from basic hand tools to machine tool set up and operation. The curriculum will cover proper hand tool use, measurement and layout, blue print reading, and operation or lathe and milling machine, through practical projects. An emphasis will be put on the making of prototype parts for basic product design.
Go to the course website.


IA-0117: Arduino for Everyone -- An Introduction to a Powerful Tool

This course will familiarize the student with the basic principles and techniques of programming and using Arduino microcontroller boards and integrating them with sensor and actuator circuits. Emphasis on general problem-solving skills and creativity in developing programs and circuits. This will be a project-based course; the majority of class time will be spent experimenting and building. Prior engineering experience not required, but the student should be comfortable with basic analytical thought and a beginning familiarity with simple electronics. All students will be using their own laptop and a provided USB cable to communicate with the Arduinos.


Go to the course website.


IA-0120: Sculpture Foundation

In this course, contemporary ideas in sculpture will be introduced in relation to work in a range of media including clay, wood, plastic, steel, concrete, and found materials. Student generated imagery will foster discussions around representation, abstraction, the body, technology, public art, and installation art. Readings, slide lectures, visiting artists and group critiques will inform the development of independent work in three dimensions.
Go to the course website.


IA-0132: Puppetry in Education

When used as an educational tool, puppetry works like magic.  Our class has two streams: teaching puppetry and performing educational puppet shows. Students will gain hands-on experience using puppetry with children, and will go through the process of a developing a show for a range of ages. Students will also learn about professional-quality construction techniques as we create puppets for a production by the concurrent class, Take the Show on the Road.  In the course of this class, students will assume the roles of art teacher, playwright, director, puppet builder, and puppeteer.


Go to the course website.


IA-0140: Rave Reviews

Our job in this course is to write reviews each week that, first and foremost, make good reading. We will work hard on developing descriptive skills in writing by reading our work to each other. How can our writing create images that move across time and space? We will learn by looking at the work of some of the great reviewers what kinds of things a reviewer looks for, and how, in a relatively short amount of space, a reviewer manages to convey the magic of the evening in print. Sometimes a show doesn't work: who takes responsibility? In an art form that is driven by collaboration and teamwork among artists in very different disciplines, how do we uncouple the work of the director from the work of the designers, the actors, the stage manager, or the playwright? And finally, who are we writing for? Are we a form of consumer reports for people deciding which show to see, or are we writing for the person who is house-bound and will only see the show through our eyes? Once every other week, we will board the PVTA bus and take our chances on a new production somewhere in the valley, either at another campus or in a town nearby.
Go to the course website.


IA-0141: Projection Design in the Theatre

Though the use of slide projections has a long history in the theatre, it is only within the last ten years that projection design has become a significant design element in many theatre productions. With the advent of easily accessible and user-friendly digital equipment and software, as well as the brighter and more intense luminosity of projection devices, projection design (video, HD, still frame, etc.) has established its place in live performance. Certainly many choreographers and small theatre groups have made video an integral part of their work for years. More recent advances in projection technology have made projections not only common, but often central to the experience of the performance environment. Continued experimentation with the integration of projections in many theatre productions has influenced other theatrical disciplines such as playwriting, directing and the traditional design areas. In this course we examine the history of projection design in theat re performance leading up to current practices. We will question the use of projection design in today?Ts theatre while we experiment with strategies for its inclusion. Students will be given an introduction to the ?otools? of projection design in a studio setting as they advance through a series of exercises and independent projects.
Go to the course website.


IA-0148: Women's Design and Fabrication

The intent of this course is to provide a supportive space for female students to acquire hands-on fabrication shop skills. Students will be introduced to the basic tools, equipment, machinery and resources available through the Lemelson Center. We will cover basic elements of design and project planning. Students will be expected to participate in discussions of their own and each other's work. Upon completion of the course, participants will have start-to-finish experience with several projects, a working knowledge of many tools in the shop, and the skills needed to go forward with their own ideas.
Go to the course website.


IA-0169: Theater and Performance of Social Change

From anti-Apartheid Protest Theater to Teatro Campesino to the street performances of ACT-UP, theater artists and performers have often taken the lead in envisioning and embodying social change. What sparks their passion? How do they balance theatrical craft with an activist vision? And what is the impact of their work? In this course, students will read key texts and see videos of the work of many of these artists as a way to explore the dynamic, electric, and sometimes explosive relationship between artists and their time.


Go to the course website.


IA-0201: Writing Project Workshop

This workshop is designed to provide assistance to students who are already engaged in large writing projects and research papers and who would like a structured meeting time in which to write and to discuss strategies for research, writing, and revision. Special attention will be paid to the writing process: conceptualization, organization, and pacing oneself through work blocks and writing anxieties. Brief reading and writing assignments will be given and, in addition to attending class meetings, participants will be expected to meet in tutorial with the instructor. Because this class supplements work already in progress, no formal instructor evaluations will be provided and the completion of this workshop will not count as course credit. This course is primarily targeted toward students who are working on large research projects for Division II and Division III. This is a co-curricular class.
Go to the course website.


IA-0211: Teaching Art in the Elementary School: From Theory to Prac

This course will explore methods of teaching art to children in grades K-6. We will focus on visual arts teaching by exploring art materials and techniques appropriate for a K-6 art program. Students will prepare themselves for behavior, academic and circumstantial situations which might arise in an elementary school classroom. The first half of the semester will include discussions and exploration of contemporary theory, issues and methods within the field of Art Education. Students will work individually and in groups to create art lesson plans and they will experience working as a team by using group consensus to make decisions and plan an after-school art program. The second half of the semester students will teach art to children. They will apply much of what they have learned by experiencing hands-on team teaching in a local elementary school. Allowing for slightly extended class time once a week during the after school program is mandatory. This class requires instructor permission in order to participate. Sign up with the instructor for an appointment slot on Hampedia or E-mail jsilver@hampshire.edu to set up an alternative appointment time.
Go to the course website.


IA-0213: A Century of British and Irish Drama

This course will take a close look at plays written in Britain and Ireland over the last century, exploring works by playwrights such as John M. Synge, George Bernard Shaw, Shelagh Delaney, Harold Pinter, Carol Churchill, Brian Friel and Martin McDonagh. Each week will be devoted to a different playwright. Students will both examine how the plays speak to the particular time and society in which they were written, and explore the creative potential of producing them on our own stages now.
Go to the course website.


IA-0223: Fiction Writing

As William Gass has written, "The writer, by choosing to write. . . is choosing to relate to the world through words." This class will treat the short story (and perhaps the novella), and our emphasis will be on developing our own faculties with those words we use to relate to the world. To that end, we will read and write both fiction and essays on the craft of writing, and will spend a good deal of our time writing in class. This course is ideal for students entering Division 2. Ideally, all class members will have taken at least one previous writing workshop.
Go to the course website.


IA-0229: Object and Environment

In this course students will explore the sculptural object as a self contained form and as an element within a found or created environment. Traditional materials such as steel, wood, plaster and concrete will be taught concurrently with more ephemeral materials including paper, wire mesh and found materials. Ideas originating within the traditions of modernism, postmodernism, minimalism, post minimalism, installation art and public art will be introduced through slide lectures, readings and independent research. The course will culminate in an independent project. An introductory level course in sculpture is strongly recommended.
Go to the course website.


IA-0233: Reading/Writing Literary Journ


Go to the course website.


IA-0234: In Search of Character

Through sculpture and drawing projects students will investigate the form and expression of the human head. Assignments will cover the study of the head in clay, the creation of masks, experiments in basic proportional systems, drawing from life and imagination, and more. Class discussions will draw from numerous cultural and historic points of view. The class will conclude with a major independent project of the student's own related to this subject. Students will have the option to work with either traditional or digital media. Significant outside work will be expected. Students will provide most drawing materials.
Go to the course website.


IA-0236: The Practice of Literary Journalism

Literary journalism encompasses a variety of genres, including portrait/biography, memoir, and investigation of the social landscape. Literary journalism uses such devices as plot, character, and dialogue to tell true stories about a variety of real worlds. By combining evocation with analysis, immersion with investigation, literary journalism tries to reproduce the complex surfaces and depth of people, places, and events. Books to be read will include: The JOHN McPHEE READER, Dexter Filkin's THE FOREVER WAR, and Wilkerson's THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS. Students will be asked to produce weekly, non-fiction narratives based on encounters with local scenes, situations and people. Mid-term and Final writing projects will be based on the fieldwork and short, non-fiction narratives that students will produce, week after week. Fieldwork will demand initiative, patience, curiosity, empathy, and guts. The writing itself will have to be excellent. Core requirementts are: (1) Meeting weekly deadlines and (2) Being scrupulously well-read and well-prepared for class.
Go to the course website.


IA-0243: First Readings: The Art of Theatrical Collaboration

This course will replicate the dynamic, collaborative spirit of a theater company at the beginning of a rehearsal process. There will be two class sessions/week: a rehearsal (class 1) and a play reading (class 2). Plays will change weekly, and will include classic texts and contemporary plays from visionary playwrights from diverse races, identities, and artistic styles. Prior to each reading in class 2, a director will give a presentation of their vision for the piece, a designer will present an initial visual response, and a dramaturg will present dramaturgical approaches. Students' roles will rotate, and it is expected that they play not only the production role that they are most familiar with, but also those they have never played. The course is designed to broaden students' repertoire of plays, to provide actors with vital experience in making strong initial choices, to build dramaturgs' research and presentation skills, and to encourage directors and designers to develop a strong initial vision and communicate it clearly. Prerequisite: A course in acting, directing, design, playwriting, or dramaturgy.
Go to the course website.


IA-0246: Air, Gas and Vapors for Designers and Artists

Air, gas and vapors are not often thought of as artistic or design mediums but they have great potential as such. This course through experiential means will explore some of the potential these "invisible" mediums have. Through a variety of projects, participants will enhance their technological creativity and designing capacity while gaining a deeper understanding of their creative process by exploring the design and artistic potential of air, gas and vapors. Additionally, participants in this course will gain an understanding of how air, gas and vapors can be manipulated, acquire basic fabrication and design skills, and do some intuitive engineering.
Go to the course website.


IA-0248: Take the Show on the Road

What does it take to produce, book and tour a theatre for young audiences (TYA) production? The answers to this question will be explored while producing Lily Plants a Garden by Jose Cruz Gonzalez. The play deals with issues of war, diversity, identity and difference, family and adoption, biological interdependence, and hope. The course will begin with researching touring practices of TYA companies(including marketing, booking, education components, management, and design elements). Next, students will serve as producers,actors, designers, publicity directors, company managers, education directors, stage managers, build and run crew, and creative drama workshop leaders for Seedling Productions (the TYA branch of Hampshire College Theatre). Finally, rehearsals, production meetings, creative drama workshop planning, as well as set, sound, costume and props construction(with a focus on using recycled materials) will be followed by performances at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and several area schools. The entire process will be informed by close collaboration with a group of child consultants. Prerequisite: Some theatre experience desirable.


Go to the course website.


IA-0250: Investigating the Tangled Ditch: A Prose Poetry Workshop

About the prose poem, poet Campbell McGrath asks, 'Do the formal fields end where the valley begins, or does everything that surrounds us emerge from its embrace?' We will explore this well-established (yet liminal) form in workshop. Assignments will include weekly readings and responses to published and peer work, imitations, and writing exercises. Each workshop member is required to maintain a course journal and to complete one formal presentation of the work of a published (prose) poet. Limited to 16 students, this course is suitable for writers who have taken at least one 200-level poetry workshop.

Please note: Beyond class meeting time, students should expect to spend at least six to eight hours per week on preparation and work. This time includes reading, writing, responding to peer and published work, and may include required attendance at, or participation in, writing-related events.


Go to the course website.


IA-0254: Intermediate Sculpture: Emphasis on the Figure

This course allows students to focus on the figure. Students primarily sculpt in clay from live models. Perception and working from life are central issues. Through the observation of the figure, students study sculptural concepts of structure, proportion, gesture and the resulting image. Students are challenged to develop their individual approach and vision towards the human figure. Group critiques will encourage the development of a critical vocabulary. After working on many different poses, in the second half of the class a model is provided for students to pursue their particular interests concerning the figure. An outside independent project is also assigned to investigate their choice of figurative issues. Prerequisite: Introductory sculpture or drawing.
Go to the course website.


IA-0260: Theory & Play: An Intermediate Poetry Lab and Workshop

In 1933, Federico Garcia Lorca gave a lecture in Buenos Aires entitled "Juego y teoria del duende." Our course borrows its title from this lecture, from this investigation of theory and play/play and theory in relation to the indefinable concept of duende. In this course, we will explore the works of six poets (among them, Nathaniel Mackay, Garcia Lorca, Fanny Howe) whose prose and poetry live, necessarily, at the crossroads of theory, discovery, and play. This class will be a kind of centaur--half laboratory, half workshop. Students will develop and participate in writing experiments in and out of class, and will also be expected to contribute poems for class workshop/provide critical feedback in response to the work of their peers. Over the course of the semester, students will generate and revise new work, while developing a portfolio of original poems and an essay on poetic theory. Eligible students should be committed to deepening their practice as creative (live!) readers and writers. Prerequisite: Eligible students will have completed one college-level poetry writing workshop.
Go to the course website.


IA-0261: Animals, Robots and Applied Design

This is a hands-on course in which students will create mechanical animal models based on their observations of live animal behaviors. Mechanical models of animals are used in both art and science. Students will learn animal observation techniques, design and fabrication skills, basic electronics and simple programming. This is a class for students with skills or interests in any of the following: electronics, robotics, animal behavior, programming, metal, wood or plastics fabrication. This will be a highly collaborative setting in which students will be responsible for sharing their own specialized skills. Students can expect introductory assignments to learn basic skills, followed by a term project. We will also examine work being done by scientists and artists who combine the study of animals with robotics and mechanical design.
Go to the course website.


IA-0266: Getting it Out There: Actualization and Expansion of Work

We have recently received funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to further our work on a low cost pearl millet thresher intended for use by small shareholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa.  Students, faculty, and visiting professionals will work together to produce at least 3 thresher prototypes suitable for extended field-testing during the latter half of 2014.  


Go to the course website.


IA-0270: Poetry and the Political Imagination

In his introduction to Poetry Like Bread, Martin Espada writes, "Poetry of the political imagination is a matter of both vision and language. Any progressive social change must be imagined first, and that vision must find its most eloquent possible expression to move from vision to reality. Any oppressive social condition, before it can change, must be named and condemned in words that persuade by stirring the emotions, awakening the senses. Thus the need for the political imagination." In this course, we will study aspects of the relationship between poetry and the political landscapes of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will read essays, poems, letters, and manifestos by a wide assortment of writers including: Anna Akhmatova, Walt Whitman, Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Bhanu Kapil, Gwendolyn Brooks, Mahmoud Darwish, Christian Campbell, Chris Abani, Kwame Dawes, and Evie Shockley. Their words will guide us into a deeper investigation of the historical potential effects of poetry in relation to perspective and social change. Over the course of the semester, class members will be expected to write critical responses to texts, memorize and recite a poem, conduct an oral presentation on an aspect of poetry and the political imagination, and participate in creative writing experiments and workshops that will help us explode, construct, and re-explode our notions of the political poem. Prerequisite: Eligible students should have taken at least one college-level workshop course (studio arts, film, writing, etc.).
Go to the course website.


IA-0273: Performing Queerness while Queering Religion: Religion, Ritual, and Research

This Seminar is for the practitioner and the theorist. We will seek to answer questions such as: What constitutes queer performance?, Is queer what you are or what you do? and What are the historical ,religious, and political aspects of queer performance? This course is not a history of LGBTQ performance, nor is it a survey of queer theory; rather, this is a course on using performance as a research methodology for interrogating texts and artistic practices.This class invites theatre, dance, and media practitioners to utilize their craft to investigate the multi aspects of queer perfomance. Special attention will be focused on the intersection between Religion (abrahamic) and Queerness.
Go to the course website.


IA-0274: Creative Nonfiction Writing: The Fragment as Form of Knowledge

"Any interruption," Lydia Davis has claimed of the fragmentary text, "either of our expectations or of the smooth surface of the work itself. . . keeps returning the reader not only to the real world but to a consciousness of his or her own mind at work." In this course-designed for students in the final semester of their Division 2, who have taken at least two writing workshops-we will read and write literary nonfiction (memoir, the personal essay, cultural criticism, etc.) that uses the fragment as form, as process, as metaphor.
Go to the course website.


IA-0276: The Past Recaptured: Photographs, Facts and Fictions, 1890-1910

This is a research course for intellectuals who are artists and artists who are intellectuals. The course has two goals: First) To investigate life in the U.S., 1890-1910, an era whose inequities and injustices, inventions and ambitions, panics and disasters eerily resemble our own. Students will sift through collections of archival photographs and an array of primary and secondary written documents to carry out their investigations. Photographs will come from large, on-line, archival collections; newspapers and novels published during the era will serve as primary written sources. (Second) To teach students how to discover and then use visual and written documents to build image/text narratives that, like documentary films, tell true stories about a tumultuous era that gave birth to what now passes for modern life. Prerequisite: Secondary school Advanced Placement(AP) American history and/or American literature.Or: Introductory/Survey college courses in American/European history or American/European literature.
Go to the course website.


IA-0280: Short Story Collections: fiction workshop

This course is designed for students in Division 2 whose concentrations include a significant creative writing component. We will read five contemporary short story collections, including a collection of microfictions as well as a 'short story cycle' or 'novel-in-stories.' Students will produce 2-3 related but free-standing pieces of fiction, to be shared with the class. Final work will include a reflexive essay and detailed revision plans for each workshop submission. Prerequisites: Students must have taken at least 2 workshop-based creative writing courses.
Go to the course website.


IA-0281: Band, Cast, Sedge, Bask: Building a Collection of Poems

In this workshop, designed for advanced students of poetry, workshop members will write and design a chapbook of 20-30 pages; at least 15 pages of this work will be 'new writing' completed in the course of the semester. The collection/chapbook produced can reflect collaboration and hybrid forms. Workshop members are expected to submit work for peer feedback and to respond to peer work in the course of the semester. Each workshop member will study and respond to collections of published poems, with an emphasis on 'first book' and small press publications. Limited to 16 students, this workshop is designed for writers who have had at least one 200-level poetry workshop.

Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours per week in preparation and work outside of class time. This time includes reading, writing, responding to peers' work, and may include required attendance at or participation in writing-related events.


Go to the course website.


IA-0287: Addressing Wicked Problems through the Practice of Social Entrepreneurship

"Wicked Problems" are complex, ever changing, and resistant to simple solutions; they require transformative and purposeful innovation. Social entrepreneurs are faced with the challenge of developing ideas that embrace and are shaped by this complexity, ideas that engage communities, cross disciplines and have the potential to disrupt and transform systems. What do social entrepreneurs need to understand about the people who are impacted by their entrepreneurial actions? Where are the spaces in which to experiment with improvisational and flexible forms of intervention that might open new economic and social opportunities? What is the role of the social entrepreneur in communities? And what do we mean by this term "entrepreneurship" anyway? In this course, we will explore these questions by examining examples of entrepreneurial action and methodology. Mid-semester we will partner with a sister course in urban planning and design to both combine our collective learning and work collaboratively on a shared project. This project(s) will bring students together to share, repurpose and utilize the methodologies they have learned about social enterprise development and participatory urban planning/design in order to creatively address an identified need or opportunity on campus.


Go to the course website.


IA-0288: Feminist Theatre Practices

What is feminism today, and how is it relevant for theatre and performance work? This class will serve as an introduction to the work of 20th and 21st century women playwrights, performance artists, and critical thinkers. We will confront feminism as a tool for reading and interpreting issues of gender and sexuality in plays and performances. We will also consider how, and to what extent, feminism influences practices of writing, performing, and spectatorship. Students will be expected to attend performances, read and write critically and perform their discoveries. This course is intended for upper-level Division II students; a general background in theatre/performance and/or feminism(s) will be assumed.


Go to the course website.


IA-0308: Advanced Sculpture: Following Form

In this class, students will have the opportunity to explore three-dimensional ideas in depth by developing one or two sculptures through a series of iterations over the course of the semester. This will allow students to focus on material and technical concerns, learn about the process of imagining and making, and engage in and respond to constructive criticism while they take ideas as far as they can. To participate in this process fully, students will also share working drawings, maquettes, and illustrated proposals with each other and research influences and methods. Prerequisite: Sculpture Foundation.


Go to the course website.


IA-0316: Advanced Studies in Theatre Design

In this course students will focus on four plays (two contemporary and two classics) for in-depth design investigations. Within a studio setting students will devise specific projects that address scenic, costume, lighting, projection or sound design issues. These projects may consist of, but not be limited to costume design renderings, scenic design models, light plots with cues, or sound plots with cues. Formal presentations are expected. Students will also be required to produce a complete design in the area of their choice for an intensive in-class critique. Students will be expected to address and revise this fifth project throughout the semester. The course will include explorations of historic and contemporary styles. Students will strive to improve their presentational skills, drafting, rendering, communication and collaboration techniques. Students are expected to meet with instructor outside of class. Prerequisites: At least two courses in theatre design.
Go to the course website.


IA-0320: Acting Contemporary American Drama

This 300 level course focuses on the actor's craft. We will identify clear and compelling character objectives and obstacles based upon an analysis of scripted and imagined biographies, develop dynamic behavior through sense memory, keen observation and broad physicalization, and cultivate a facility for the critical analysis of dramatic literature. Additionally, each actor will script (at least) one original monologue or scene, and perform contemporary American scenes in one public performance. Instructor permission only.
Go to the course website.


IA-0340: Advanced Drawing: Special Projects

This course will integrate advanced level drawing assignments with two student defined half semester long independent projects. Readings, slide talks, field trips to nearby drawing sites, and independent research will provide a context for the development of two cohesive bodies of independent work. Drawing as a visual practice will be defined broadly to allow for the exploration of forms and imagery across multiple genres, media and dimensions. Group critiques will provide a critical environment and offer a forum for the discussion of contemporary issues in drawing. Prerequisite: At least two drawing courses at the college level. Additional studio art and art history courses highly desirable.
Go to the course website.


IA-0350: Creative practices, the arts, social justice & change

This Division III seminar will provide a forum for Division III students working on a wide spectrum of creative projects that intersect with issues of social justice, social and political change. The seminar will be explore some new shared readings but will be structured collaboratively by participants and will explore a common selection of short readings/ viewings / activities alongside student presentations and discussion of their work. The seminar will foster interdisciplinary discussions about the very diverse creative approaches and practices that can forge new insights into questions of power, exploitation, discrimination, inertia, neglect etc. , looking at different ways creative arts can inspire attentiveness to social issues, stir understanding and longing for social change - and spark or communicate different levels of engagement in social justice issues. The readings/ viewings/ listenings will be selected in dialogue with participating students and the angles explored influenced by their concerns. The seminar is for Division III students working in any creative/art medium linked to some aspect of social awareness and transformation. It aims to foster interdisciplinary creative dialogues and insights - and will draw inspiration from visits from creative practitioners in the Valley.
Go to the course website.


IA-0387: Creative Writing Concentrators' Seminar

This course is designed for students working in all genres of creative writing who are completing their second semester of Division 3. The seminar will provide a supportive, critical forum for sharing and responding to independent work as students bring their projects to a close. We will also consider the question of a 'community' for writers, who often labor in private. Students may be invited to attend and respond in writing to three public readings that will take place in the spring. Prerequisites: Students must have taken at least 3 creative writing courses requiring intensive peer critique. The Division 3 project must feature a significant portion of creative work.
Go to the course website.


IA-1IND: Independent Study - 100 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.


IA-2IND: Independent Study - 200 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.


IA-3IND: Independent Study - 300 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.

 
 

© 2014 Hampshire College 893 West Street Amherst, MA 01002 . 413.549.4600