CBD
 

Cognitive Science Course Web Sites

Spring Term 2014 Courses

CS-0110: Web Development I: Developing Websites and Web-based Software

Want to impact the world? Learn to code. We use the web all the time. Most college students describe themselves as "computer literate." How many can truly say they are authors of the internet? In this course students will be exposed to the process of designing and creating web-based content, following some of the most commonly used technologies used in real-life scenarios. Successful students will become proficient in HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, Javascript and the basic principles of computer science.
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CS-0134: Brain and Cognition

The problem of explaining how the brain enables human conscious experience remains a great mystery of human knowledge. This course is an introduction to cognitive neuroscience in which we will attempt to examine the neural underpinnings of the mind's complex processes, paying particular attention to vision. Cognitive neuroscience incorporates elements of physiological psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology and neuropsychology. In this course we will become familiar with the tools of research used in cognitive neuroscience and with questions that motivate researchers in the field.


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CS-0141: The Social Psychology of Stereotyping, Person Perception, and Intergroup Relations

This course will be an in depth examination, from a social psychological perspective, of how stereotypes are formed, how stereotypes influence our perceptions, and how these perceptions influence our relationship with others. Classic and contemporary research will be examined. Students will be expected to write brief reaction papers to weekly readings, as well as complete a final paper and presentation on a topic of their choosing.


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CS-0146/NS-0146: The Future of Food

Nothing in life is more important than food. But billions of people don't have enough, the way we grow food poses dramatic challenges to the environment, and our collective health and quality of life are in the balance. This course will take a critical multidisciplinary look at the past, present and future of food, farming and eating. Are our current food sources sustainable? What are the ecological impacts of production? What will be the impact of climate change? Can we find new plant and animal species that will enhance our food 'security'? Is genetic modification of food really a bad idea? In what ways might alternative production systems, such as small scale, local and organic farms provide more sustainable solutions? Could the globalization of technology and information change the way we farm? How can education about diet and nutrition affect our behavior? How many farms and how many farmers? Class will meet twice per week for lectures, discussions, small group work and projects.
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CS-0174: Computer Animation 1

This course will introduce students to the production of animated short films with the tools and techniques of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics. Readings and lectures will cover the theoretical foundations of the field, and the homework assignments will provide hands-on, project-based experience with production. The topics covered will include modeling (the building of 3D objects), shading (assignment of surface reflectance properties), animation (moving the objects over time), and lighting (placing and setting the properties of virtual light sources).
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CS-0179: Field Methods in Animal Behavior

This class will cover research methods for observing, coding, and analyzing animal behavior. We will practice behavior sampling and recording techniques on both domestic animals at the farm and wild animals in the campus woods. Students will carry out independent team projects on a species in the Hampshire woods and we may design and conduct a class study on the communication behavior of a local species. We will examine how to summarize, analyze, and present data. Papers and presentations will be due for each project. Students will be required to learn graphical techniques for presenting data as well as statistical techniques for calculating inter-observer reliability scores.
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CS-0205: Social Development

Social relationships and social understanding are important parts of our lives from infancy onward. In this course we will explore the developmental significance of parent-child and peer relationships from infancy into childhood and adolescence. We will also discuss children's understanding of theory of mind, gender, emotions, and self. In particular, we will focus on age-related changes in these skills and how they impact social relationships. We will also consider cross- cultural difference in patterns of social behavior. Evaluation will be based on participation, a series of short papers, and a longer final project. Students will read research articles and be responsible for class presentations.

Course Expectations: In addition to attending class, students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time. This time includes completing course readings, preparing written responses and discussion questions, and researching and writing an integrative final paper. This is a guide, students may need to spend more time during some weeks when working on assignments or based on particular readings. 

 


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CS-0206: How People Learn

In recent years, as a result of interactions between cognitive psychology and education, we now have many ideas about classroom learning, and approaches to teaching, testing and assessment. We also have strong evidence that implementing these ideas could really improve learning for all children and youth, including those who are under-resourced. In this seminar we will work to understand the findings by reading and discussing a selection of theoretical works from cognitive psychology and examine their practical applications to education through discussion and time observing/assisting in a classroom or tutoring/mentoring. We will also learn how to evaluate educational claims. Students will be evaluated on a series of short reaction papers, a final paper, and their general participation. This course can be used to satisfy the Educational Psychology requirement for licensure students. This course will require field trips that are the responsibility of the students.
Go to the course website.


CS-0208: How People Learn

In recent years, as a result of interactions between cognitive psychology and education, we now have many ideas about classroom learning, and approaches to teaching, testing and assessment. We also have strong evidence that implementing these ideas could really improve learning for all children and youth, including those who are under- resourced. In this seminar we will work to understand the findings by reading and discussing a selection of theoretical works from cognitive psychology and examine their practical applications to education through discussion and time observing/assisting in a classroom or tutoring/mentoring. We will also learn how to evaluate educational claims. Students will be evaluated on a series of short reaction papers, a final paper, and their general participation. This course can be used to satisfy the Educational Psychology requirement for licensure students. This course will require field trips that are the responsibility of the students.
Go to the course website.


CS-0212: Philosophy of Color

The philosophy of color, through the science, art, history and technology of color. Some classroom demonstrations and experiments. Topics chosen from the following: aesthetics of color and color in film and the moving image, color in studio art, astronomical color and the color of stars, animal coloration, animal color vision, color words and imagery in poetry and literature, anthropology and linguistics of color naming, physics and psychology of color (including color illusions), color vision, color in the visual cortex, color and the mind-body problem, variations in color vision, models of color space, impossible colors. The focus of the class will be on the philosophy of color, and philosophical answers to the questions 'What is color?' and 'What is a color?' in the light of the above fields. Contributions will be made by visiting lecturers in the different fields from Hampshire and other colleges.


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CS-0222: Pixelbending: Under the Hood of Modern Filmmaking

With an affordable digital camera and simple editing software, anyone can be an image maker. But what does it take to be an image master? How does one take control over the images and films one makes rather than ceding it to the engineers of the software and hardware? This course is designed for students who seek mastery over the digital images they create, capture, edit, and/or distribute. The class will expose the foundational core that hides behind the interfaces of digital imaging and filmmaking technologies but which is crucial to using them with precision and finesse. Topics that may be covered include digital image representation, compression/decompression (codecs), frame rate changes, compositing, matting, tracking, color correction, color grading, and more. Prerequisite: An evaluation/passing grade from at least one media production class (film, video, animation, photography.)
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CS-0227: Designing Treasure Hunts

What are the elements of a great puzzle or a great adventure? In this game design class, we will discuss the history of treasure hunts, create and playtest our own treasure hunts, and analyze the business elements of modern treasure hunts (yes, some professional game designers are making money designing treasure hunts!) The course will culminate in a campus-wide treasure hunt collaboratively designed by the students in this class.
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CS-0241: Modern Statistical Practices: Intermediate Statistics Using R

How do we know what we know? And, how sure can we be about it? These are the challenges of inference. Statistical thinking worries about both these questions. Statistical methods allow us to assess risk and measure uncertainty. Over the last 50 years statistical practice, like so much of our world, has dramatically changed and yet, fundamentally, the same challenges remain. "Everything has changed" focuses on statistical methodologies, their implementation, their computation, their scale, their applicability and their "productization." "Everything is fundamentally the same" reminds us that life is still uncertain. Chance, expressed as variability, remains the dominant determinant of most life events. In this course you will think about these ideas, learn to compute about them using the R language, and learn to wrestle with real data - some of it from your projects, some about the effects of Hampshire College and some from my data archives.


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CS-0243: Abnormal and Clinical Psychology: Evidence, Etiology, and Treatment

It seems like most people we meet have a psychological disorder, are taking medication, or seeing a mental health professional. Why is this? What roles do culture, development, and biology play in the etiology and treatment of a psychological disorder? How do we evaluate "best practices" for treatment? This course will examine psychopathologies such as Depression, Anxiety, Eating Disorders, Schizophrenia, and Substance Use from multiple perspectives. We will explore various forms of evidence and engage in critical examinations of research related to the development and treatment of these disorders. Students will read primary, interdisciplinary research and write several short papers, in addition to a semester long individual project that connects course material to their primary area of focus or a population of interest.
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CS-0244: Privacy in the Age of the Internet

Inspired by the Edward Snowden and National Security Agency events of the summer of 2013, this course will examine the ways in which current technology facilitates and even encourages the collection of information on individuals, the ways in which that information can be used, pros and cons of such tendencies, and a variety of techniques to either expand or restrict the sharing and collection of data. The course will both deal with the mathematical foundations of these techniques and its social implications. While students might opt to write programming code or delve into very technical matters as part of the course, this will be only one of several ways to engage with the course, and will not be required. No previous computer experience is required for the course.


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CS-0254: Genetic Programming

Genetic programming is a computational technique that harnesses the mechanisms of natural evolution -- including genetic recombination, mutation, and natural selection -- to synthesize computer programs automatically from input/output specifications. It has been applied to a wide range of problems spanning several areas of science, engineering, and the arts. In this course students will explore several variations of the genetic programming technique and apply them to problems of their choosing. Prerequisite: One programming course (any language)


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CS-0260: The Social Psychology of Emotion, Cognition, and Bias

This course will be an exploration, from a social psychological perspective, of how emotions and cognition interact to influence our thoughts, perceptions, and behavior. Specifically, we will be examining how they affect social perceptions, social interactions, and intergroup relations. Students will be expected to read primary research articles in psychology - prior experience with these articles, including a basic understanding of research and quantitative methods, is highly recommended. Additionally, Students will be expected to write brief reaction papers to weekly readings, as well as complete a final paper and presentation on a related topic of their choosing. PREREQUISITE: At least one prior course in Cognitive Science.


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CS-0261: Animals, Robots and Applied Design

This is a hands-on course in which students will create mechanical animal models based on their observations of live animal behaviors. Mechanical models of animals are used in both art and science. Students will learn animal observation techniques, design and fabrication skills, basic electronics and simple programming. This is a class for students with skills or interests in any of the following: electronics, robotics, animal behavior, programming, metal, wood or plastics fabrication. This will be a highly collaborative setting in which students will be responsible for sharing their own specialized skills. Students can expect introductory assignments to learn basic skills, followed by a term project. We will also examine work being done by scientists and artists who combine the study of animals with robotics and mechanical design.


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CS-0264: New Media: Innovation, Adoption, Future

Do new media change the world? How can we forecast new media? Nearly every modern medium of communications has been heralded for its utopian potential, from the nineteenth century telegraph through tomorrow's 4G cell phones. But seeing what's coming is harder than you think. This course will examine several case studies in the history of electrical and electronic communications to understand the complex process of introducing and adopting new media, including issues of technology forecasting, technology standards-setting, the role of the state in fostering media development and the invention of unpredicted media uses by media users. Students will write short, informal responses to readings and a mid-semester essay, and they will complete a final project and present it to the class.
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CS-0267: Research Experience in Psychology: Understanding Autobiographical Memory

In this course students will gain first-hand experience in the process of conducting research in autobiographical memory. Students will be exposed to some of the main issues in autobiographical memory for personal past events throughout the childhood years and into adulthood. We will consider the potential roles of social interaction, self, culture, and emotionality of events as well as developmental changes in autobiographical memory reports. Course requirements will include reading primary research articles, and designing and executing an original research project. This is an intensive course comprising instruction in all areas of the research process, including collecting, coding, and analysis of data. Prerequisite: Previous coursework in psychology.

 

Course Expectations: Because this is a project-based course, it is essential that students attend every class. In addition, students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time. This time includes completing course readings and written work, designing and conducting a research study, and preparing a written report of the study and findings. This is a guide; students may need to spend more time during some weeks when working on assignments or based on particular readings. 


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CS-0278: Sex on the Brain: Gender, Sex, and Biology

This course is designed to examine sex, gender, and sexuality in multiple contexts. The primary aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the biology and neuropsychology of sex gender and sexuality. Additionally the course will examine how biological and environmental factors influence sex gender and sexuality across development and how these factors influence differences in brain and behavior. Course requirements will include reading primary research articles in the fields of psychology neuroscience sociology anthropology and women's studies. Students will also be asked to conduct library research write several short response and review papers and conduct a larger research project. Students are not required to have a scientific background but they are asked to be open to reading and evaluating scientific research.
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CS-0282: Media in the Built Environment

The future of media "functionalities" - what media do, not the objects that they are - is likely to entail their ubiquity, embedded and distributed throughout the spaces where people live. There is a hint of this already in the way we use smartphones. They are portable, personalizable, multi-functional and almost never disconnected from the web. This advanced seminar will explore theories and case studies that suggest how this near-term media future may come about. Students will pursue their own independent projects - research, model building, demonstrations - while discovering and sharing common readings. Ideally, we will approach the subject from diverse backgrounds, including design and architecture, media and cultural studies.
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CS-0285: Philosophy of Language

How do words and sentences do it? How do they get and keep their meaning and reference? How can the word "London" attach itself to London, its meaning travelling at high speed like a guided missile through space for over 5000 kilometers before ending up, safely in London - and never missing its target? Or does the word refer to an idea in the mind? But then how does that idea attach itself to London, its sense travelling at high speed like a guided missile . . . Topics will include meaning and reference, performative utterances, names, demonstratives, pronouns, definite and indefinite descriptions, and - the dark side - metaphor and other kinds of figurative language. Emphasis on the understanding of existing theories in the field and the development of students' own views through portfolio and notebook work. Two short (6 pages) papers, two exams (not unseen) and reading question sets. Prerequisite: At least one previous class in philosophy
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CS-0287: Educational Research in Theory and Practice

Many people have opinions about the best ways to improve education, yet few people have conducted research in educational settings. However, improving education requires evidence gathered systematically through research. In this course, students will learn methods for conducting research on learning and teaching that yield evidence leading to program improvements. Methodologies include classroom and field trip observations, interview, survey, pre-post assessment, and discourse analysis. Students learn these methods while collaboratively participating as part of a research team with the professor on an on-going, NSF-funded, design-based research project. We will read and discuss relevant literature on learning, design of learning experiences, and how to help more students succeed. This course is designed to teach various learning research methods and is particularly helpful for students who are in their last semester of Division II, are interested in education and wanting to start thinking about a Division III project. Field trips will be a part of the students' research and course experience. Prerequisite: Some basic statistics (t tests, descriptive statistics, etc.).
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CS-0291: Software Engineering

Bigger-sized software programs, which are developed through a longer time span, require development steps that are not necessary for smaller projects. This course will expose students to the design, implementation, testing, and maintenance of this type of projects, putting particular but not exclusive emphasis on agile development methods. Students will be involved in the actual GROUP implementation of a major piece of software, in conditions similar to those found in industry. Prerequisite: Students must have ample experience before the beginning of the course with the C, C++, or Java, or some other high level languages, in at least a semester of computer programming experience.


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CS-0293: Introduction to Semantics: Meaning and Cognition in Linguistic Structure

This course presents Semantics as a cognitive phenomenon: what aspects of the representation of reality are relevant for speakers when they use language to convey meaningful utterances? The first part of this course will provide basic insights into classic topics in Semantics such as the nature of meaning, the problem of sense and reference, lexical semantics, meaning as logic form, and meaning as context of use. The second part will explore the relation between language and cognition from a cognitive-functional framework (Cognitive Semantics). Finally, the third part will show how linguistic structures in different languages are motivated through the cognitive principles proposed in the second part. We will apply this Usage-Based approach to morphosyntactic analysis, particularly the nature of grammatical categories, the semantic basis of grammatical relations such as subject and object, and the conceptual motivation behind active, passive, middle and causative constructions in different languages. Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, philosophy of mind, or introduction to anthropology.
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CS-0298: Words, Faces and Other Minds

Human social interaction relies upon the ability to correctly attribute beliefs, goals, and percepts to other people. This set of meta-representational abilities--a "theory of mind"--allows us to understand the behavior of others. Individuals with autism are often thought to lack a theory of mind as they show impairments on tasks testing this ability, as well as impairments on tasks involving language and face processing. In this course we will examine the links between these three domains-language, face processing and social cognition, and the role each plays in helping us navigate the social world. Prerequisite: One prior course in cognitive psychology, linguistics or neuroscience.


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CS-0299: Special Education: Learning Differences and the Role of Inclusion

Schools operate on the idea that learners are "regular" or "special needs." This course examines these ideas, exploring topics related to a variety of learning differences including ADD and autism, as well as factors that influence a child's readiness to learn. With an emphasis on inclusion in schools, students will discuss the impact of current policies, laws, assessments, and practices on students who learn "typically" and on those who learn "differently." Students will consider adaptations to the learning environment, classroom structure, and approach to teaching that enable all children, regardless of their learning strengths and needs, to reach their potential and achieve meaningful goals. Students integrate their knowledge and further their practical understanding through a community engaged learning component.
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CS-0313: Brain and Cognition II: Electrophysiological Methodologies

This course is an upper-level research seminar designed for students who wish to learn electrophysiological techniques and how to apply those techniques to answer research questions in the domain of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuropsychology. In this years course students will help design a study of attention, run participants, and analyze the data. Additionally, they will have the opportunity to develop an original research project from conception through piloting participants. Course requirements will consist of reading primary research articles, designing, and executing an event related potential (ERP) research project. The class will cover all elements of setting up an ERP research project and we will focus on both the theory of electrophysiological research techniques as well as practical aspects of developing and running a research project.
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CS-0319: Interdisciplinary Game Project

In this course, students will delve deeper into game development by getting practice working as a specialized member of a small team. Students will continue to hone game development skills, taking on one of four possible roles: Programmer, Modeler/Animator, Painter, or Audio designer/Project Manager. All students will contribute to the game design. The course will use Unity 3D as the game engine, which is used in many professional game development projects. To ensure balanced teams, the instructor may add students to the course who have specific needed skills (programming, art, design, project management, other). Prerequisite: An evaluation/passing grade from 2 computer science, OR 2 art, OR 2 audio/music courses.
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CS-0330: Cognition and Behavior in Domesticated Animals

Domesticated animals - agricultural livestock such as sheep, cattle, pigs, and chickens as well as companion animals like dogs and cats - are of deep importance to human society. The primary focus of the course is on how domestication shapes the mental and behavioral characteristics of these animals. We also explore related issues in human-animal interaction, animal welfare, and agricultural practice. Learning, socialization, biological development, and evolution are central themes; in addition, we undertake some comparative discussion of the wild counterparts of domesticated animals, explore the nature of feralization, and look at cases (like elephants), which raise questions about how domestication is defined. Primarily a reading and discussion seminar, we engage with several dozen papers from the professional scientific literature, and, for their final project students are expected to grapple with a question of their own choosing in the form of a literature review, a critique of published work, or a study or proposal for a study of their own. Prerequisite: Prior work in the biological and/or cognitive sciences
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CS-1IND: Independent Study - 100 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.


CS-2IND: Independent Study - 200 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.


CS-3IND: Independent Study - 300 Level

To register for an Independent Study with Hampshire College faculty you need to pick up an Independent Study form in the Central Records office and get the form signed by the faculty supervisor as well as your advisor.
Go to the course website.

 
 

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