Brian Schultz

Associate Professor of Entomology and Ecology
Hampshire College Professor Brian Schultz
Contact Brian

Mail Code NS
Brian Schultz
Cole Science Center 110b
413.559.5486

Brian Schultz, associate professor of ecology and entomology, received a B.S. in zoology, an M.S. in biology, and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Michigan.

An agricultural ecologist and entomologist who does research at the Hampshire College Farm Center, Schultz has spent a number of years in Central America and the Caribbean studying methods of insect pest control. He is also interested in statistical analysis and world peace.

Recent and Upcoming Courses

  • This course examines agriculture as a set of ecological systems and related social aspects, focusing on organic and/or sustainable production methods, and agroecology. It refers to ecology in the sense of interactions between organisms (e.g., pests and predators; wildlife) and the larger sense of environmental impacts (e.g., pollution; climate change), along with key related social issues and solutions (e.g., power relationships; government subsidies). A broad range of topics will be covered, including: pest control alternatives (e.g., pesticides; biocontrols); soil ecology, fertility erosion, and carbon sequestration; animals in agriculture; genetically modified crops; biofuels; farm labor; global vs. local trade; economic influences; power bottlenecks; and more. Course work will consist of readings, discussion, writings, lab and farm work/observations, and projects, tailored to individual student experience, interests, and goals. Field work will include our College farm and forest, and trips to other local farms and habitats. Keywords: sustainable, agriculture, ecology, agroecology, organic

  • This course examines agriculture as a set of ecological systems and issues, focusing on organic and/or sustainable methods, and agroecology. It refers to ecology in the sense of interactions between organisms (e.g., pests and predators) and the larger sense of environmental impacts (e.g., pollution; climate change), along with key related social issues and solutions. A broad range of topics will be covered, including pesticide problems and alternatives, soil fertility and erosion, animals in agriculture, genetically modified crops, biofuels, farm labor, global vs. local trade, and more. Course work will consist of readings, discussion, writings, farm work/observations, and projects. We'll introduce current issues and practices for a more sustainable agriculture, with added readings and projects also tailored to individual student experience, interests, and goals. Keywords: sustainable, agriculture, ecology, agroecology, organic

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